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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have 63 Nove with 350cu motor. Have fuel issue and it keep fouling the plugs. Can start the car, but after he gets warmed up the fuel pressure goes to 0. Car runs kind of hot 190 to 220 degrees. Have the large radiator so the radiator guy says it not a radiator. Have installed 15 in electric fan with thermostate at 180 constant power. Have ceramic coated headers. Think it may be running too lien causing more heat. Have moved fuel line away from the block and put in an electric fuel pump closer to the fuel tank. After shutting down then trying to restart the plugs get fouled and the fuel pours into the cylinder flooding plugs with gas and fouling the plugs. The seems to only happen to me. My friend can start the car when he works on it and its fine. We think the car is possesed.:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Have a Edlebrock 1460 600cfm carb. What is unusual is you can adjust in and out all of the way and it doesn't seem to make a difference it like you can't chock it or give it too much gas you can adjust all the way out and it doesn't make a difference
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
seems as though you let it set until the next morning and make sure the battery is fully charged and it fires right up. Could it be the alternator isn't working and it starts up after having a full charge or is it just because it's had time to not be flooded. The fuel pressure is still a consistent. Starts about 5lbs heats up then goes to 0.
 

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Have 63 Nove with 350cu motor. Have fuel issue and it keep fouling the plugs. Can start the car, but after he gets warmed up the fuel pressure goes to 0. Car runs kind of hot 190 to 220 degrees. Have the large radiator so the radiator guy says it not a radiator. Have installed 15 in electric fan with thermostate at 180 constant power. Have ceramic coated headers. Think it may be running too lien causing more heat. Have moved fuel line away from the block and put in an electric fuel pump closer to the fuel tank. After shutting down then trying to restart the plugs get fouled and the fuel pours into the cylinder flooding plugs with gas and fouling the plugs. The seems to only happen to me. My friend can start the car when he works on it and its fine. We think the car is possesed.:confused:
It's the way you're holdin' your tongue against your eye tooth that prevents you from seein' what you're doin'. :eek:

If the motor is fouling plugs, then it is probably NOT too lean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes this is my first time on here. As you can probably already see I am not well versed or knowledgable on cars or mechanics. My friend (who by the way is very well versed and both knowledgeable and capable) is scratching his head to. I've got to start some where. I've been working on this car for 3 years and the bug a boos are starting to take it's toll. I just want to enjoy driving the car like it's meant to be but I can't trust it to go any distance if every time I go to start it it won't start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
This kind of starts before I got the car. I bought it from my brother who had to take it back from a friend of his who owed him money. I've asked my brother questions about what went into the car and he either can't remember or doesn't know. The guy who built the car loves cars, but can't drive because of seizure disorder. I have a feeling that the car was built with a lot of Coors influence so who knows what is actually going on. I know that the motor was a crate motor. I was told from Summit, but I found a receipt and a newspaper add from a local area engine place. I would appreciate an answer from someone willing to share it. If your aren't willing to share knowledge then I really can't say anything other than I am not here to pizz anyone off. I am here to seek possible solutions to a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not sure what I can say to that. I am not here to torch anyone off. I will be the first one to say that I don't know a lot about cars or mechanics. That is obvious. I am here seeking a possible answer from anyone who is willing to share some knowledge. A guy has to start somewhere. I spent a lot of time in the military away from home and didn't get a chance to work on cars. Now that I am retired and settled down I am trying to work on a couple of projects so I can enjoy driving and showing cars and trucks. Would appreciate possible answers to my problem.
 

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First thing you need to do is R&R the carburetor or replace it with a new one. I suspect that the float has completed its cycle of duty and become fuel-logged if its composite or it has a hole in it if it's brass. Replace the float assy and set the float level according to a tech source that gives you the proper static setting and float drop measurement. Replace the needle and seat while you're there and rebuild the whole assembly with new parts.

No modern 4-bbl carburetor needs more than 5 psi fuel pressure at the carb inlet. I know you said yours operates between 5 and zero, but that's not possible to operate at zero, so I would fault your pressure gauge as being bogus. Tee of at the carb inlet and run a copper or nylon line back to the firewall, up past the hood lip and to the cowl in front of the windshield. Mount a 0-15 psi liquid-filled mechanical fuel pressure gauge on the cowl with tie-wraps and duct tape (this is only a temporary mounting until you get the pressure sorted out) so that you can monitor the pressure through the windshield as you drive.
Fuel Pressure Gauge 0 15 PSI Chrome Ring with Black Face Mechanical | eBay
Mr Gasket 2975 Fuel Pressure Gauge Adapter | eBay
If pressure is too high or surges, install this regulator or one that is equivalent in quality....
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/hly-12-803

Install a fuel filter cannister on either side of the fuel pump and keep a close eye on changing out the elements, particularly on the one between the pump and the tank. Install a ~15 amp toggle switch somewhere handy in the driver's compartment so that you can apply power to the electric fuel pump and fill the carburetor fuel bowl before you ever turn the key to apply the starter. The pump will go brrrrrrrrrr while it fills the bowl and then will trail off to a tick-tick-tick when the bowl is full.

The cooling problem can be traced to the fosdick electric fan and lack of a shroud. Install an engine-driven 18" diameter, 7-blade steel fan complete with thermostatically-controlled fan clutch along with a 190/195 degree high-flow thermostat and tight-fitting shroud that directs 100% of the air through the radiator core and your cooling troubles will go away.

While you have a handfull of wrenches and are in the mood, follow this tutorial concerning nailing down the ignition timing.
http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki/Determining_top_dead_center
Once you have zero nailed down, you can put increasing amounts of timing into the motor until you get the results you want. Remember that as you increase the base timing at the crank, you have to decrease the centrifugal timing in the weights to keep the total timing within reason. Fast-burn heads will like about 34 degrees total initial and centrifugal. Plug vacuum advance into the manifold.

By the way, 1460 is the part number for a metering rod, not a carburetor part number. Do you know the part number for the carb?

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
First thing you need to do is R&R the carburetor or replace it with a new one. I suspect that the float has completed its cycle of duty and become fuel-logged if its composite or it has a hole in it if it's brass. Replace the float assy and set the float level according to a tech source that gives you the proper static setting and float drop measurement. Replace the needle and seat while you're there and rebuild the whole assembly with new parts.

No modern 4-bbl carburetor needs more than 5 psi fuel pressure at the carb inlet. I know you said yours operates between 5 and zero, but that's not possible to operate at zero, so I would fault your pressure gauge as being bogus. Tee of at the carb inlet and run a copper or nylon line back to the firewall, up past the hood lip and to the cowl in front of the windshield. Mount a 0-15 psi liquid-filled mechanical fuel pressure gauge on the cowl with tie-wraps and duct tape (this is only a temporary mounting until you get the pressure sorted out) so that you can monitor the pressure through the windshield as you drive.
Fuel Pressure Gauge 0 15 PSI Chrome Ring with Black Face Mechanical | eBay
Mr Gasket 2975 Fuel Pressure Gauge Adapter | eBay
If pressure is too high or surges, install this regulator or one that is equivalent in quality....
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/hly-12-803

Install a fuel filter cannister on either side of the fuel pump and keep a close eye on changing out the elements, particularly on the one between the pump and the tank. Install a ~15 amp toggle switch somewhere handy in the driver's compartment so that you can apply power to the electric fuel pump and fill the carburetor fuel bowl before you ever turn the key to apply the starter. The pump will go brrrrrrrrrr while it fills the bowl and then will trail off to a tick-tick-tick when the bowl is full.

The cooling problem can be traced to the fosdick electric fan and lack of a shroud. Install an engine-driven 18" diameter, 7-blade steel fan complete with thermostatically-controlled fan clutch along with a 190/195 degree high-flow thermostat and tight-fitting shroud that directs 100% of the air through the radiator core and your cooling troubles will go away.

While you have a handfull of wrenches and are in the mood, follow this tutorial concerning nailing down the ignition timing.
http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki/Determining_top_dead_center
Once you have zero nailed down, you can put increasing amounts of timing into the motor until you get the results you want. Remember that as you increase the base timing at the crank, you have to decrease the centrifugal timing in the weights to keep the total timing within reason. Fast-burn heads will like about 34 degrees total initial and centrifugal. Plug vacuum advance into the manifold.

By the way, 1460 is the part number for a metering rod, not a carburetor part number. Do you know the part number for the carb?

.
Techinspector1 - Thanks for your insightful, educated response. I will get with my friend and go over all of your advise. The carb was new when we put it on, but my friend said we may have blown the power valve in the carb. It's not going to hurt to go through the carb. The fuel pump we have is a cheap Mr G. I've since got a Holly "Red" that we are going to install. We do have a shroud on the radiator with the 15' electric fan installed between the motor and the radiator, but will loo at your advise thoroughly. Appreciate you sharing your experience! We plan to hard line the fuel from the pump to the carb to try to reduce the heat transfer to the rubber fuel line. We will put in a fuel filter between the carb and the pump. We do have a regulator but we took it off when we put the electric fuel pump on. I like he idea of having a guage and plan on having one under the dash. Anyway I appreciate your response.
 

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You will get the best response from a mechanical fuel pressure gauge, but you absolutely should never run any live fuel pressure lines into the driver's compartment. Use a mechanical and mount it on the cowl like I suggested. Electrical fuel pressure gauges may not give you the readings you need.

You also may want to improve your circle of friends. Edelbrock carbs do not have a power valve.

Please, in the name of common sense, find the part number of the carb and post it here. I have much more to post once I find out what we're dealing with.
 
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