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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently working on restoring 1949 Ford F3. I have the pickup stripped down to just the frame and have been using a grinder and wire brush to clean the rust off of the frame. I am not able to get into all of the areas with the grinder and have been debating if I should remove all the frame rivets and break the frame down to individual pieces so that I can get it really clean before I paint it. I would then get new rivets and use them to put the frame back together. My question is, is it really worth breaking the frame down this far or should I find another way to get into all the nooks and crannies in the frame? I am open to suggestions.
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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when i did my 58 chevy truk frame i bought one of eastwoods Blast-Out-of-a-Bucket for the nooks and crannies of the frame
it's been handy for spot blasting a lot of stuff i have around
for $29 it's been pretty handy

Blast-Out-of-a-Bucket Abrasive Gun



i used home depot fine sand in the bucket, playground sand will just plug the nozzel
buy the good carbide nozzle if you want to blast much with it
it blasts very slow, not like the picture. you have to hold it 2'' from the blastee :D

best used outside on a tarp to recycle the sand easier
i used it inside but had to hang lots of plastic sheeting
 

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when i did my 58 chevy truk frame i bought one of eastwoods Blast-Out-of-a-Bucket for the nooks and crannies of the frame
it's been handy for spot blasting a lot of stuff i have around
for $29 it's been pretty handy

Blast-Out-of-a-Bucket Abrasive Gun



i used home depot fine sand in the bucket, playground sand will just plug the nozzel
buy the good carbide nozzle if you want to blast much with it
it blasts very slow, not like the picture. you have to hold it 2'' from the blastee :D

best used outside on a tarp to recycle the sand easier
i used it inside but had to hang lots of plastic sheeting

How did you dry the fine sand? Was it pretty dry from the get go ? I need to be picking up media to blast a trailer.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I went and bought a spot sand blaster today and it worked great for cleaning up the hard to get to places. Thank you for your help. I didn't put a tarp down but next time I will put one down to help with the clean up.
 

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Right, well it was worth a try. I run a 3/16 nozzle on my blaster and it seemed to do fine, but I always screen everything before pouring it in the blaster too.:thumbup:


Kelly
 

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Do you have the same (or similar) blaster? I should try it again. It was my neighbor who actually tried it and said it kept plugging up, so he might have been doing something wrong.
 

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Mine is similar to this:
ALC Pressure Abrasive Blaster 90 lb Cap 40002 | eBay

And we use around a 100 CFM compressor
One thing that I always do is screen the abrasive before I put it in the blaster, and of course before reusing the abrasive. Mine has a valve on the bottom of the tank that regulates the flow of abrasive to the nozzle, I usually run it about 1/4 to 1/2 open. It seems like anymore than that and it is just wasting media and tends to clog the nozzle at lower pressures on sheet metal.


Kelly
 

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Also to the OP, sorry for taking a detour on your thread. You may want to invest in one of these hand held blasters if you are doing the build yourself and trying to avoid having someone else media blast. They are handy for small parts, and hard to reach areas that can't be cleaned with wire burshes or grinding. If you are not familiar with blasting, be sure to wear a quality N95 mask and of course other obvious protection (eye protection, gloves, ears, long sleeves, etc) Screen your abrasive before you use it and on sheet metal use the lowest pressure possible to remove the paint, rust. Blast at an angle to do the least amount of damage to the panels as well.

Zendex Speed Blaster

The suction style blasters already mentioned will do okay too, just a little slower than a pressure pot.

Kelly

******Nevermind, I just read where you already bought one******* Sorry
 

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Do you have the same (or similar) blaster? I should try it again. It was my neighbor who actually tried it and said it kept plugging up, so he might have been doing something wrong.
The problem with the pressure blasters are that the tank is pressurized with air from the compressor and any moisture in the air will tend to make the media clog.

The syphon type blasters draw the air into the nozzle so it is not contaminated by compressor air.

Unfortunately the syphon feed units provide less media and tend to work much slower. But there is nothing slower than a pressure feed unit that keeps clogging up.

John
 

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John, what do you know about sandblasters? You have never worked on anything rusty have you?:evil:

Just kidding, but that is a good point you bring up. I run the air through 2 tanks and then a moisture filter in line before the blaster. Having 2 tanks really cut down on the moisture, the tanks act like a big water trap (air in the top and out the top, all the moisture falls to the bottom of the tank). Also having a big compressor that isn't working at full capacity helps a lot too.

Kelly
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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How did you dry the fine sand? Was it pretty dry from the get go ? I need to be picking up media to blast a trailer.
the sand is sold by the bag at my local home depot as fine sand.
dry and cheap, we also use it in the blast cabinets
i did not have to screen it for initial use, but i did recycle used sand and did screen that

for screening i cut the center out of a 5 gal bucket lid to for a ring
cut metal window screen to fit over the bucket and sagged it in a bit
bucket, screen and then lid ring
i'd pull up the corners of the tarp and shovel sand into the bucket
 

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kelly that stuff will plug up my blaster. I actually have a bag of it...we're very close to a TSC. In fact, that's where I got my blaster. This is the one I have

JobSmart® Portable Abrasive Blaster - Tractor Supply Co.
Kelly, I lied. I don't think this is what I have out in the shop. I went and got some bags of fine sand from Home Depot tonight, but then after reading about filtration of sand--to do it right is expensive, and to do it any other way just scares me. So I'm going to go with something with low free silica like this. The price is still pretty cheap.

And if this is as low dust as they say then it will be nice. I have aluminum oxide in my blast cabinet and it gets to be so dusty in there I can't see what the hell I'm doing.
 

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I have never tried any, but Shine uses "Star blast". I don't know if it makes less dust than the others, but it is also supposed to be silica free. Either way you should wear at the very least a N95 mask (I usually wear a half face paint mask with the charcoal filters) due to all the dust from the paint/rust being blasted off, (aside from possible lead, and who knows what else). You only get one set of lungs.........:pain:

Kelly
 

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Kelly, I lied. I don't think this is what I have out in the shop. I went and got some bags of fine sand from Home Depot tonight, but then after reading about filtration of sand--to do it right is expensive, and to do it any other way just scares me. So I'm going to go with something with low free silica like this. The price is still pretty cheap.

And if this is as low dust as they say then it will be nice. I have aluminum oxide in my blast cabinet and it gets to be so dusty in there I can't see what the hell I'm doing.

I use crushed glass and like it a lot, I get it from a New Age Blast Media distributor for $8 per 50# bag. Course is good for frames, med 40/70 is good for sheet metal, and fine 70/100 is like baby powder--- good for removing paint by layers. I blast at 90 PSI normally, and cut it to about 60 PSI on the flatter surfaces. But that is on tri5 chevys, the newer cars with thinner ga metal will require lower pressure.


Take note of the instructions from New Age on using crushed glass, they actually recommend using less material.


Tips On Blasting With Glass Abrasive:
•You do NOT want a lot of abrasive in the air stream. The grains collide with themselves, lose energy, and hit your surface with less impact.
•Your goal is to not be able to see the abrasive in the air stream. If you can see it, meter back, as you have too much abrasive going through your hose.
•Start by purging your line so it is abrasive free. Then slowly open the feed until you can see the abrasive in the air stream. Then slowly close the feed until you can no longer see the abrasive in the air stream. This is what you want.
•If you have too little abrasive in the air stream, you will likely hear a high pitched whistling sound. Start over and this time repeat the process slower so you can see when the abrasive is no longer visible in the air stream. Be Stingy! You will achieve better results with a lean supply.
•Move your nozzle faster than you normally would. Glass abrasive blasts very fast, very clean. You will be surprised how light and sharp it is, and how much feathering you get with it.
•Blasting hard mil scale will require using a finer grit size, as it cuts more like a knife than a hammer. This is why it is great for softer, elastomeric coatings that often bounce back heavier abrasives.
•Blast at a 90 or 100 psi, or less. Higher pressure will be counterproductive due to how light glass abrasive is. You will simply shatter the glass rather than allow it to work for you.
•You can use a finer size than you would normally use.
•Estimate 5 to 6 lbs per sq ft usage. So a 1,000 sq ft area would require 5,000 to 6,000 lbs of media.

Tried Crushed Glass Media - Sandblasting - Contractor Talk
 

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Estimate 5 to 6 lbs per sq ft usage. So a 1,000 sq ft area would require 5,000 to 6,000 lbs of media

That's a LOT of material compared to regular media like blasting sand or coal slag. Can the glass be re-used? I just blasted a 66 Olds 442 completely (inside and out, all body panels, floor pans inside and out, frame, wheels, etc) EVERYTHING metal was blasted to bare with 1,000 pounds (20, 50lb bags) of Black Diamond, and would have used about the same amount of sand if I had used regular blasting sand. I re-used it once during the process, so roughly 2,000 pounds of sand or slag would have theoretically done it all. According to those figures a 16' long x 6' wide car (approximately 500 Sq ft figuring for all sides and panels with the frame)blasted completely would take around 3,000 lbs of glass material. Maybe I am figuring wrong? but it seems like that would be more expensive and not as productive?
20 x $6.00 = $120 for slag or sand VS 60 x $8.00 = $480 for glass

Also what is the MOH for the glass? Sand is usually inthe 7.5 range and black diamond is around 6.

I am not trying to argue or start anything, just not sure I am understanding the advantage of glass?

Kelly
 

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Kelly, your milage may vary-- LOL. I posted the contractor talk forum because I can't really say how far you can get with glass. I just blast welding areas, jams, firewall, occasional panel, etc. They claim less than 1% silica, 6 on the mohs scale, and no dust, but I will say just less dust. So it is cleaner. I guess anyone interested would just have to get a bag and try it. Thats what I did and I like it. I also like the idea of recycling glass bottles, but I do wonder when glass bottles will no longer be used.

A volumn user would certainly have to weigh one cost over the other, and I know they sell it by 2000# and 3000# pallets, so there may be discounts. If you call them they will fill your mail box full of reasons to use it, it convinced me to at least try it.

You hear a lot of questions and comments on the settings and proper way to blast, so its obvious that a lot of guys don't know, and I like the way they give an easy to understand way of adjustment, and don't push excessive usage.
 

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You hear a lot of questions and comments on the settings and proper way to blast, so its obvious that a lot of guys don't know, and I like the way they give an easy to understand way of adjustment, and don't push excessive usage.

I agree and the way they have described the media flow adjustment, is the way I try to describe it to people. Most people who have problems with the tip clogging are either having a moisture problem, or they are flowing too much media. It will vary with different media, but generally speaking, I set the media valve at 1/4-3/8 from closed and adjust up from there if needed, but I never need to run mine over 1/2 open to get the wanted results and not waste media or clog nozzles.

Kelly
 
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