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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
got the stainless fuel lines installed over the weekend,, I picked up a Rigid 377 flaring tool for the 37 degree flairs as I saw that recommended on this forum when I did a couple of searches,,, that is one great tool, flared 3/8 and 5/16 stainless like moving butter..and great looking flairs to!

but my question is,, other than looks, is a compression style fitting just as reliable as a AN flair?

for the steel to nylon adapters I used the Dorman 800-035, that have a compression end to connect to the stainless line, a barbed end for the nylon side.
http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-30430-800-035.aspx
the compression side tightened down nice,, asking,, as easy as the Rigid 377 made a flair,, the compression fittings took the making of the flair completely out of the picture,, so are they just as good?

thanks
 

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DadTruck said:
got the stainless fuel lines installed over the weekend,, I picked up a Rigid 377 flaring tool for the 37 degree flairs as I saw that recommended on this forum when I did a couple of searches,,, that is one great tool, flared 3/8 and 5/16 stainless like moving butter..and great looking flairs to!

but my question is,, other than looks, is a compression style fitting just as reliable as a AN flair?

for the steel to nylon adapters I used the Dorman 800-035, that have a compression end to connect to the stainless line, a barbed end for the nylon side.
http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-30430-800-035.aspx
the compression side tightened down nice,, asking,, as easy as the Rigid 377 made a flair,, the compression fittings took the making of the flair completely out of the picture,, so are they just as good?

thanks
A compression fitting doesn't have the mechanical strength of a flared joint, IMO. The best reason for using a 37 is it only takes one flare, no need for a double flare so they can be made faster, and possibly on thicker and/or harder hard lines.

It's MY opinion that a double 45 is just as good, if made correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Colbalt327,, what you said,,the point on the mechanical strength,, makes sense to me,,thanks


oh,, and another thing,, installing the barbed fittings on the nylon hose,,
I heated the nylon in boiling water for about 10 minutes and heated the fitting in an oven set at 325...

I had the fitting clamped in a vise grip standing up and setting on a pizza tin,,

they went on fine,,
as an experiment I tried one with just boiling the nylon, it went about half on then froze,, I think the key is also having the fitting hot..just be sure the install push is all one movement, if you stop, you are done.
 

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While not a 'lover' of compression fittings, they will probably work fine under the 8-10 psig that a fuel line will see (I assume that you are talking mech. fuel pump/carb). My question is - why use nylon fuel line and not -AN and 37* the full length?

Oh and that Rigid flare tool - I'm guessing you might have seen one of my posts about how I like it. Several years later after doing mine, not a sign of a leak, brakes or fuel.

Dave W
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Irelands Child

I don't post here to often,,but I check this forum frequently and have always got great tips and ideas,,,

on the fuel line what I am doing is installing a 28 gal fuel tank and pump module from a 92 D-150 into my 83 D-150

the 92 fuel pump module accepts a fuel line connector like the Dorman 800-082
http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-9569-800-082.aspx

hence the nylon line..
I am keeping the carb motor from the 83 so I am using a Areomotive 13204 to control the pressure,,
here is a photo

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157630037480330/
 
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