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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know what the pressure is in a fuel system of GM cars.

This is a 03 Chevy Malibu.

If the fuel line leaks do I need to replace the entire fuel line ?

Thanks !


454 RATTLER
 

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With the engine running should be about 59# of pressure. With the key in the on position with engine off should be about 52# of pressure. Where is the line leaking? I don't know if the have repair kits for fuel injected gas line. Check with a Chevy dealer at the parts counter, if not replace the entire line. I wouldn't take a chance of it catching on fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's leaking at a clamp just in front on the rear wheel. The parts stores offer a kit that is a steel line (15") with a fitting and "o" ring. The other end just has a compression fitting.

I'm also told that it could be repaired with a short length of high pressure rubber fuel line and double clamps.

Thanks for the help, guys.


454 RATTLER
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It had a small hole in it where the line was clamped to the body.

I cut a short piece out and replaced it with high pressure rubber fuel line. I then put two clamps on each end and remounted it to the body.

No leaks at all but, I'll keep watching it for a while.

Thanks for the ideas guys.


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If you didn't already, it might be a good adea to put a partial flare at the cut ends, so that if the hose starts to slide off the tubing, the hose clamps will encounter the "lump" and hold on a little better.

Pat
 

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I have bought nylon fuel line in bulk, like 25 feet rolls.
Repairing a high pressure fuel line can be dicey.
Female fittings can be recycled or purchased new and have barbs that make it easy, just slide them together and voila.
That doesnt solve the issue of what to do at the filter where the exiting line is an O ring fitting.
There is a hydraulic crimp tool that makes that style of "welt" in the tubing that is used. It is like 500 bucks.
Using a different style filter that has quick connects in and out can solve the problem , and make it easy to use the plastic line and fittings which work very well and wont leak.
Shoving the barbed fittings into the nylon line can be a bit tough, but they hold very well, and I havent had one leak yet.
I use the vise that comes with a brake line flair kit,to hold the tubing, and I clamp it in the vise, with about 1 inch of tubing showing through.
Then you can shove the barb into the nylon with your bare hands, but it takes a lot of effort, and you need to keep the barb fitting good and square or you will flop the tubing over and kink it. If it flops over and kinks, I cut off the bad spot and start over.
I have a LOT of experience repairing fuel lines, there is no room for mistakes or shoddy repair.
I also use a lot of factory plastic ends by carefully cutting the nylon back behind the barbs and peeling or rolling the tubing, like a can opener so as to not "scar or Gouge" the barbs . That is VERY important as the barbs are the actual seal.
I collect wiring harnesses and fuel line connections from ALL the salvage yard engines I install. I am allwyas using a connector from a harness or fuel line to make a repair caused by rust....or rodents.:smash:
 
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