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I have a 1969 Chevrolet C10 with a small block 350 in it. I replaced the original gas tank with a bed fill blazer tank. I have an electric Holley QFT fuel pump mounted right by the gas tank. The issue I am running into is the fuel pump losing prime and not being able to pump gas to the engine. I tried a fix from youtube and connected the fuel pump to a 16V dewalt drill battery and the fuel pump primed and the engine fired right up. I have seen some of the voltage boosters online and am wondering if I will need one of those or if there is another fix I can try. Thank you so much for your time.
The pump is slightly below.
inlet comes out of the tank at the top.
3/8ths fuel line.
The pump is the QFT 125. The link to it is Quick Fuel 30-125-1RQFT: Electric Fuel Pump 125 GPH - JEGS High Performance

Thank you,
Bryce
 

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How are you providing power to the pump?
What gauge wire, what type of switch/relay? Is the switch/relay new?
Does the pump have a good ground?

It says the pump only draws 4 amps, so it shouldn't be a big deal.
Check voltage at the pump with the pump on. If there is a high resistance in the circuit, it will drop the voltage when the circuit is energized.
If voltage checks good, then check the ground.
 

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The pump is slightly below.
inlet comes out of the tank at the top.
The pump is slightly below what? the outlet? The tank?
If it is below the tank OK . If it slightly below the outlet , at the top of the tank, that can cause problems.
If it is low ,like below the tank , once it is primed it will pull fuel well as it has the benfit of a "syphon" ,like when you syphon fuel out of a tank
At the top of the tank the pump always has to pull to get fuel .That can lead to a starvation problem
A vented cap should be used as the pump will struggle to pull fuel from a tank tha builds vacuum
Try it with the cap loose just to rule it out.
 

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Pump should be no higher than the bottom of the tank. If the out flow is from the top of the tank then the pump depends on a siphon for feed. If the pump is higher than the bottom of the tank then it must lift the fuel once the level is below the height of the pump. This is not an performance that turbine pumps do well. Just to repeat what LATECH said.

A lot can be said for over sizing the wiring by a gauge or two to insure there is plenty of power available for the pump. All connections including grounds need to be clean and dry and kept that way.

Bogie
 
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