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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all. Coming back to the well for More help.
I am installing the Tanks inc MU in my 41 Chevy that I have relocated to the trunk floor. It has a 3/8” female NPT. My question is about the male fitting for it. Does it need to be flared or can it be a flat edged fitting like the picture?
Yellow Font Line Screenshot Parallel
 

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If using non-fuel injection then a barbed fitting would be fine BUT there is a catch. With today's fuel additives and questionable off-shore hosed regular "fuel" line usually doesn't work for long before bits and pieces end up in the fuel system. The solution is to use something else such as hard line (3/8" brake line) or the newer nylon fuel line. A short piece of fuel injection rubber hose to connect to the tank and hard line and another to connect at the engine end. Fuel injection hose is a bit pricey and only 1 foot on each end would do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If using non-fuel injection then a barbed fitting would be fine BUT there is a catch. With today's fuel additives and questionable off-shore hosed regular "fuel" line usually doesn't work for long before bits and pieces end up in the fuel system. The solution is to use something else such as hard line (3/8" brake line) or the newer nylon fuel line. A short piece of fuel injection rubber hose to connect to the tank and hard line and another to connect at the engine end. Fuel injection hose is a bit pricey and only 1 foot on each end would do.
Thanks for that information!
 

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One or two barbs can allow a clamp to lay flat on the flat part of the fitting.
If it has barbs along the entire length that can allow less clamping force.

You want the fitting to be long enough for 2(or more) clamps 180 degrees offset from each other behind the barbed part. Fuel injection clamps are not much more expensive and have rolled edges that wont bite into the hose.

It is also recommended that you use fuel injection hose. This is rated for higher pressures having better construction. But more importantly it is rated for todays fuels.

When looking for fittings the most important thing to remember is angle. The angle of the threads and/or angle of mating surface is off then things are going to leak.

I perfer to have solid fittings that require the hoses to be cut off to be removed. Some people perfer a swivel fitting in these areas. Solid fittings at areas that remain stationary and then push lock fittings in areas that need to be serviced like fuel filters or intakes makes for a fuel line system with minimum potential leak points.

Know that if you want to race this then many bodies limit the amount of flexible hose you may have.

Push lock fittings using nylon line can make for a easy install and leak free fuel line that can support most types of fuels. You can still use hose at the tanks and such. But the nylon is something to consider running.
 
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