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Learning from your mistakes
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 blazer tank for my truck, but I need to modify it by welding up the old sending unit hole to make way for the 5 hole unit I got. I was going to use a stock sender, but the new tanks are integral sender pump units, and the pumps put out 60 psi! so I was thinking of welding the sending unit hole closed and then adding a new seperate pickup, sender, and vent elsewhere on the tank. The welding shop says this will be quite an undertaking cause they will have to purge the tank. So now I'm thinking maybe I should just give up the idea to do this junkyard tank and get on of those generic pickup tanks. For a little over $200 I can have a tank that will accept all my fittings, already have baffles (the blazer tank does not), and be reasonably easy to fit in. I don't know the welding cost, but its probably gonna be over a $100.
The only reason to do this with the blazer tank was to say that I adapted something from a late model vehicle to work on an old truck, but I don't have the time/knowledge to chase down the parts and get the modifications made. I never thought this was gonna be such a hassle when I got into it.
I just want to hear some other peoples advice on this. Thanks in advance.
 

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What kind of truck do you have. Read this on how I spliced a late model Chevy half ton 20 gallon tank into my '53. Page 17 shows the tank being mounted in the frame, page 10 has two additions; one showing how I adapted the '53 sending unit to the modern hole cover and another showing the finished installation.
 

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Learning from your mistakes
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79 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info willys, sorry I forgot to specify more in my first post. I got a 50 chevy that has been 4-linked, so the spare tire area is kinda the only space left for a tank. Space is a little tight to put a tank like you have in since mounts would get in the way of the bars.
I also envy you to have a junkyard around that would have mid 70's vehicles in it. around here you can't get much older than mid 80's.
 

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Member - AMC/Rambler "guru"
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1,781 Posts
You don't have to weld on the Blazer tank at all. Cut a piece of metal the size of the original sending unit and just make a cover. Use something like Mr. Gasket #2 that is fuel resistant to seal it. Or make it permanent. Clean the tank and cover piece real good with a solvent that evaporates (mineral spirits, paint thinner, or alcohol, NOT gasoline -- which would leave a residue from the additives) then use a fuel proof epoxy like J.B. Weld (I think... read the label!). You can use J.B. Weld instead of welding anywhere there isn't a lot of stress on a part. I've used it to repair rust holes by epoxying a piece of metal in hard to get to areas, or relatively small areas (less than 6" diameter) in body panels before I got a welder. Have to use a little filler to smooth it out whether you use epoxy or weld. I riveted and epoxied the larger patches, then ground the heads of the rivets off the next day. The epoxy needs 12 hours to cure enough to work around. This is the only problem -- but not if you/re in no hurry or plan your work! Most take 24 hours to reach full strength -- read the label!
 

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guba_unus said:
I also envy you to have a junkyard around that would have mid 70's vehicles in it. around here you can't get much older than mid 80's.
Actually I got it from an old junkie. I cut the front half of the pickup frame off so he could make a trailer out of the back/bed in exchange for the tank.

You can set up the sender for the old gas gauge in your tank using the tank's hole cover like I did mine as shown in the journal.

Oh, and I weld on gas tanks all the time. First I let them air out in the sun until I can smell zero gasoline odors. Then I tape all the holes closed with duct tape except for the one near where I want to weld. Then I support the tank very well and fill it with water through the remaining open hole to just below the weld site. Supporting the tank is important since 20 gallons of water weighs about 180#! With it prepped like this, there is virtually no vapor space for gas vapors to gather and the gas vapors are gone anyway. Have done many this way with zero problems.
 
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