Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
That stuff looks really slick but I'd be afraid to ask for a quote.
I've seen a similar (likely cheaper) system that uses poly pipe rather than the aluminum but still was a push toghther system. I''ve just forgotten where I saw it now.
 

·
tryn to learn
Joined
·
841 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
i just got a qoute...

$430 for basic
$705 for deluxe

now thats expensive...


OPTIONAL HOSE REEL
(25FT)-$149
(50FT)-$223

OUCH!
 

·
Im trying to have an idea!
Joined
·
380 Posts
* Thanks search engine - you come thru again :thumbup: *

Has anyone installed this stuff...
 

·
©®™
Joined
·
1,289 Posts
302/Z28 said:
Outrageously expensive would be more like it. Just use cold water pipe PVC, it is rated to 450psi. Take extra special care with the glue joints.

Vince
Vince, I see that you actually posted this reply a while back and someone bumped this thread back to the top.
Have you been keeping up-to-date with all the negatives that have posted on this board about using PVC for compressed air lines? It is considered a real no-no. Now that I am educated about it, I am considering pulling out my PVC pipe and intalling copper. I just posted on the Garage Safety thread about this subject yesterday:

http://hotrodders.com/forum/showthread.php?t=31945&page=3

Roger
 

·
Gotta love a turbo!
Joined
·
2,640 Posts
Hmmm, mine's all CPVC lines throughout. Been that way since 1987... So what's the nix on plastic?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Short version without links:
If you happen to hit it with something hard, it shatters and sends shards of plastic into your body at high velocity.
 

·
or Jeff, or Doc, or...
Joined
·
989 Posts
PVC gets pretty brittle when its cold out. Unheated garages get pretty cold too. Lets do te math:

PVC: Fast and cheap, yet dangerous and susceptable to rupture

Copper:moderate price and moderate install time-susceptable to damage, yet safer than above

Black Iron: slower to install, slightly more expensive, but CAN BE FOUND IN BUILDING SALVAGE YARDS for next to nothing ! Just about damageproof. Safe.

Hmmm. Do we follow the "do it once, do it right" method, or play russian roulette? The choice is yours. No sense arguing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
Just came across this old post and thought I would jump in and give my "professional" opinion. (pipe fitter by trade)

Galvanized sched 40 is a the best option, but slow to work with and requires specials tools.

Black iron pipe is also an option, but the moisture will start rusting on the id and that will head right to your end use device.

Type L copper is also a good option, more expensive, but easier to work with and requires only a turbo torch and tubing cutter.

PVC is not a suitable product, not even the green colored product, it doesn't hold up over time.

PEX tubing is not rated for air, and is not UV stable.

And finally dont use garden hose either, I have arrived at a job site to fix an "air leak" and low and behold what did I find, a blown out section of garden hose ran across the rafters linking 2 areas together, ROFLOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,920 Posts
Old Fool said:
I have arrived at a job site to fix an "air leak" and low and behold what did I find, a blown out section of garden hose ran across the rafters linking 2 areas together, ROFLOL!

LMAO :D , In all my years of plumbing/repairing air systems I have seen some really goofy things and I think I can top that one! I once saw a 55 gallon oil drum used for a pressure tank! That thing was swollen out almost round and the ends were bulged out but he did not seem concerned at all about it or what might happen! He had it pressurized to around 50 lbs (he said he only used it to air up tires) which is far more than I would have thought it capable of holding and more than enough to have been a major disaster if it had of ruptured but at least he had it in a fenced in area where no one was likely to be around it. He had plumbed the air lines in the plug fittings in the top and even had a drain valve on the thing! :drunk: I have been tempted to mention this thing before when the discussion got around to air tanks but I was afraid no one would believe me but since you have the story about the water hose/air line I thought this might be a good time to point out what some people will do. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Old Fool said:
...Galvanized sched 40 is a the best option, but slow to work with and requires specials tools.

Black iron pipe is also an option, but the moisture will start rusting on the id and that will head right to your end use device.

Type L copper is also a good option, more expensive, but easier to work with and requires only a turbo torch and tubing cutter...
This is one of the few times that I've seen Galvanized sched 40 mentioned as the best option.
I usually read that copper is better. I can't afford copper so I'm using Galvanized sched 40 for my new ToyRoom in a couple months.

Thanks for the advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
Sanctifier said:
This is one of the few times that I've seen Galvanized sched 40 mentioned as the best option.
I usually read that copper is better. I can't afford copper so I'm using Galvanized sched 40 for my new ToyRoom in a couple months.

Thanks for the advice.
Good choice, it will last nearly forever.

I know of NO reason why copper would be better, easier yes, better no, imho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,920 Posts
Old Fool said:
I know of NO reason why copper would be better, easier yes, better no, imho.


Copper has a big advantage in cooling and thus helps to remove moisture from the air so in this respect it can be better. Over long distances (over 100 ft) this advantage would be lost but in a small shop where the air line can be 50 ft or less this cooling advantage can help quite a bit. There is also the argument that galvanized pipe will flake off and cause problems but I have seen a heck of a lot of galvanized pipe used and I have never seen this to be a problem. I agree that the galvanized pipe is a good choice, a very good choice in fact, and although Copper is my favorite I would not recommend spending a lot of extra money for Copper over iron pipe unless the system is going to be really short and the piping is going to be the major source for cooling before the water separator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
I agree with the cooling aspect, I was only thinking of the mechanical aspects.

For not a lot of money why not put a few feet of copper fin tube , and add a fan if you wish, the best of both worlds.

p.s. You can find used fin tube relatively cheap at metal salvage and used appliance businesses.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top