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I have a 1989 Chevy corsica. I found out where the coil is located and don't want to go through the trouble of pulling it off. Is there any other way to test it with it being on the veihicle. also how do you test the ignition box without taking it off the veihicle.

Thanks
Eric:confused:
 

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Yes there is a way. If I remember right, there are 3 coil packs facing the front of the car right? well just pull the 2 wires off one coil pack (remember where they go) and try starting the car. Look to see if the spark is strong enough to jump between the two posts. If it does, then it is ok. do the others untill you find one coil pack that is weak. Lemme know if that helps. I am assuming that you have the 2.8 v6?
 

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this car has 3 coil packs? If none of them are producing spark, I think its safe to say that you need to move one step further back in the spark process to find your problem. Pull the plugs one by one, if this is a v6 car, each coil feeds two slugs. Statistics tell us that you need to pull a minimum of 3 wires to find that 2 coil packs are non functional, and 5 for all 3. I seriously doubt they all took a crap at once, they're not getting juice.

K
 

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Spark

If none have spark then you probably need to replace the module. The coils mount on top of the module and are a Bi**h to get to for replacement. Also if the module doesn't fix it then you might have to replace the crank sensor. The Crank sensor tells the module to fire the coils. I have ran across the cam sensor being bad and have found (rare) the magnet missing out of the camshaft gear. This sensor is located below the water pump on the timing cover and when you take it out, roll the engine over until you see the magnet, Make sure that it is there. If you have a good meter and a diagnostic flow chart for the ign system then you can save alot of parts changing. But if not then you might need to swap out some parts until it runs. The easiest thing to do is replace the crank sensor. If is doesn't start then I would try the cam sensor. Then after that I would go for the ignition module. If the coilpack is on the front side of the engine then remove the radiator fan (4 10mm screws) and that will give you a little more room to work. If it's on the rear then remove the engine strut (dogbone) and make a temporary strut out of flatbar metal so that you can pull the engine forward, install the bolts and work with a little more room. This will keep the engine tilted so that you can get back there and work. I can say that 9 times outta 10 it is the ignition module and this thing costs like $75.00 from Autozone and I have seen AC Delco units go for like $180.00. So it might be safe to try a salvage yard for the swap out party. Good luck
 

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Not for sure what the reading should be,get a multi-meter and check your resistance at the coils.The coils are not that hard to remove,seems harder than it actually is.
 

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Got spark?

If your coils are rear mounted just pull the 2 nuts off the master cylinder and push it foward you will be able to see and touch the coil pack set up. Cuztomcarbuilder had the right thing on removing the fan if foward coil packs.
From past experience working in a GM dealership one quick thing we did was to pull the wires off one at a time and inspect the coil towers. 90% of the time a dead coil left the tower looking like pure rust and almost burned off. If you find that condition plan on replacing the plug wires also.
 
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