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Would it be a crime to hang drywall sheets, 4' x 8', vertically instead of horizontally? I've been reading about installing them horizontally provides more strength vs. vertically. But the way the 2' x 4's studs are oriented, installing them horizontally would require me to cut the ends of the sheets to make it land on a stud so it can be butted against another. Then, that second butted sheet would also have to be trimmed because it would end up on a stud. I hate working with butt joints when taping/joint compounding them. By installing the sheets vertically, I would be working with more joints, but they would be beveled, much easier to work with to get smooth finishes.

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41' Chevy Master DeLuxe Tudor
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It's not against the law to hang them vertical. You obviously know to make sure your taper of each piece hits the stud halfway like hanging wood paneling. If not scab a stud in so it will work out. It will make an easier job of taping and finishing since you'll have a factory taper at each joint. It can be done either way. Don't worry no one here will turn you in to the law. :D
 

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Lost in the 60's
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Horizontal or vertical.....it just a matter of preference thats all. Do it however you want to. The only time the builders around here put it up horizontally is when they have 4X12 sheets. Myself.....I would put the 4X8 sheets up vertically.
 

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I remember years ago when I helped my dad build our house the wall studs were built on 16" centers, so the sheetrock was all hung horizontally and did not have to be cut at all. The ceilings were at 8', so there was no scabbing in at the top either. I don't even know if they sold the stuff in anything longer than 8' sheets back then. Most everything now is done horizontally that I've seen since then though.
 

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or Jeff, or Doc, or...
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Drywall is SUPPOSED to be hung vertically!!! 8' high, 4' wide.

Its weaker hung horizontally, unless you place a horizontal framing member where the sheets meet. If your studs are 16" on center, without framing members, you have 14-1/2" of drywall seam that hangs in the "open bay". Without a framing member between the sheets, you can pretty much guarantee a crack in the joint somewhere down the road.

I'm on commercial projects all the time, and they NEVER hang it on the flat. Its always vertical. The exception is latheboard, or shaftwall. Those are either double layer (shaftwall) or covered with plaster (latheboard). The corridors in schools (2 hour Firewall) are are double layer, and they are both vertical, but overlapped.
 

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Beenaway2long said:
Drywall is SUPPOSED to be hung vertically!!! 8' high, 4' wide.

Its weaker hung horizontally, unless you place a horizontal framing member where the sheets meet. If your studs are 16" on center, without framing members, you have 14-1/2" of drywall seam that hangs in the "open bay". Without a framing member between the sheets, you can pretty much guarantee a crack in the joint somewhere down the road.

I'm on commercial projects all the time, and they NEVER hang it on the flat. Its always vertical. The exception is latheboard, or shaftwall. Those are either double layer (shaftwall) or covered with plaster (latheboard). The corridors in schools (2 hour Firewall) are are double layer, and they are both vertical, but overlapped.
Except when it is a 9' ceiling...then you lay down 54" board. :D
BTW, laying it down will cut your joint taping footage.
 
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Around here, a lot of residential work is done with the sheets hung horizontal. The reason for this is that the taped joints are not as noticeable. Since very few walls in a residence are longer than 12', they don't have to deal with butt joints with the ends of the sheets.

In my garage, when I installed the drywall, I placed it vertically. Since I was going to tape the joints, but it wasn't really that important if you could find the joints, i could see no reason to do it any other way.

Aaron
 

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Just one of the guys
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Drywall is SUPPOSED to be hung vertically!!! 8' high, 4' wide.
Yep....all contractors on houses around here hang them horizontally. Personally I prefer vertical for the fact that with vertical you have a tapered edge on both sides to finish off. With hanging horizontal you have one seam all around at 4' high which makes it easier to finish, but you have to full size ends at 8' which you have to feather out quite a ways to get it to look smooth. If you paint a wall with horizontal drywall with a gloss or semi-gloss, the ends will amost always end up showing. With vertical, this problem can be eliminated.

Kevin
 

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On standard framing either wood or metal, vertical or horizontal instalation is acceptable. Both ways are accepted by the gypsum manufactures and is noted in their installation guides. Most common types of gypsum wallboard are available in 8' to 16' lengths, you may not find them at the home centers but the drywall distributors carry the various lengths and the 54" widths.
Ceilings are recommended to be installed at right angles to the framing especially when the framing is on 24" centers, it reduces the chances of the wall board sagging, and when covering 24" spaced ceiling framing ceiling board is recommended.
 

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In my area, residential wood framed walls are hung horizontally. Yes, there is a 14 1/2" "unsupported area on the bevel joint, but that is inconsequential. When a board is hung vertically, the entire joint in centered on one stud. Wood studs tend to twist and distort somewhat over time, and this will pull screws sometimes and crack the joint. Breaking the butt joints on that same stud when hung horizontally, results in a 4' butt joint and the next sheet runs across that stud and breaks on another stud, which makes the stud less inclined to twist.
On commercial metal stud construction, board is hung vertically, for speed, and ease of installation...AND for fire resistance. All joints are backed up by the metal stud, so even if it is not a designated fire wall, there is less chance of flame spread through the joints.
 

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Any drywall that I have hung depends on the wall height and length and how much waste will be left is how I hang it. Besides being mostly Irish the rest is Scottish(tight with a buck - so waste not,... :nono: )

Dave
 

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tjn/56nomad
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drywall-horizontally or vertically

The drywall should be hung vertically for strength, each vertical joint is then backed up with a stud. If you run the drywall horizontally, there is no backup at the joints. TJN :)
 

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tjn/56nomad
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drywall-horizontally or vertically

The drywall should be hung vertically for strength, each vertical joint is then backed up with a stud. If you run the drywall horizontally, there is no backup at the joints. TJN :)
 

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been doing construction for 30 years and other than the fact that depending on the length of the wall you might have some wasted sheetrock this is mostly a choice of preference. for a little wasted sheetrock you can make life easier by running horizontal as the longer seems can be taped while standing on the ground rather then jump up and down the ladder
 

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My garage plan is for 1 ft concrete at the bottom with a 10 ft stick wall on top of that, for a total wall height of 11 ft.

This was a suggestion taken from a different thread, stating that the concrete at floor level was better for avoiding water damage to the drywall ... especially when washing the floor.

Now THIS thread is making me think about what a pain that is going to be to drywall ... :(

I suppose that hanging the sheets horizontally, and cutting them in half (also horizontally) makes the most sense.
 

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59 wagon man said:
been doing construction for 30 years and other than the fact that depending on the length of the wall you might have some wasted sheetrock this is mostly a choice of preference. for a little wasted sheetrock you can make life easier by running horizontal as the longer seems can be taped while standing on the ground rather then jump up and down the ladder
A VERY good point indeed! :thumbup:
 
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