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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for bolts for my crossover steering. Most important bolts on the thing so I want to make sure they are correct.
I don't care about the finish or cost. But they need to be strong (8+) and up to the task.

I am running 3/4 heims with high misalignment that will go above and below the spindle on the passenger side.
I am opening up the holes from 5/8 to 3/4" to fit the bolt.

The heim is 7/8" high, the spindle 1" and the other heim is 7/8".

The pitman and drivers spindle will be 7/8" less.

So I need at least 3" on the passenger side and two 2" on the drivers side plus the threads.

Then at least 2 washers and at least 1 nut per bolt. I really like and want to use 2 nuts per bolt to lock them on the threads then have enough threads to wire the bottom a few times.

Which has had me searching for the right "safe" way to do this.
I found this old post by tech.

"I encounter this often on drag race chassis inspections. "Grip length" is the term used for the smooth, unthreaded portion of a bolt. The bolt chosen should have a grip length just slightly longer than the length of the bore in the Heim and steering arm, so that the threads don't start until you have cleared both.

Also, proper installation of a Heim dictates the use of safety washers such as the part number MCW8 shown here for 1/2" fasteners.....
http://www.midwestcontrol.com/catdis...ort.php?pg=552
Use a washer on each side of the Heim, with the small diameter of the cone resting on the ball of the Heim. This will give the Heim room to move without binding up and further, will catch the linkage in the event the Heim ball separates from the housing. That's why they're called safety washers. Use this arrangement regardless of whether the installation is in single shear or double shear and you'll have a bulletproof install. This became such a problem on Junior Dragster steering linkage that I purchased a bag of safety washers to give to the teams to fix their binding problems. Even professional chassis builders don't get it."





So I need one with 3" of grip length and two with 2" of grip length.

Then another 2.5" to 3" of threads per bolt for the washers, 2 nuts I am expecting to be 3/4" high then a few exposed threads.

Correct?
 

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Type of bolt you want to an anchor through two hiems and the steering arm itself is called a Shoulder Screw, or Shoulder Bolt. You'll also hear diemakers refer to them as "Stripper bolts" because of where they are commonly used in press-room dies.

They have a precision sized shank....-.002-.004" size tolerance on the diameter, and they are also precision in their grip length, then enough threads for washer and nut.
You need to have the precision sized shank to avoid slop in a steering linkage.

Alloy Steel Shoulder Screw, 3/4" Shoulder Diameter, 3" Shoulder Length, 5/8"-11 Thread | McMaster-Carr

Same-Size Thread 18-8 Stainless Steel Shoulder Screw, 3/4" Shoulder Diameter, 3" Shoulder Length, 3/4"-10 Thread Size | McMaster-Carr

Very similar is Mil-Spec AN(Army/Navy)and NAS bolts, they are similar but tolerance is -.006" on the shank diameter.

You need to be reaming that spindle steering arm hole to size, not drilling it with a 3/4" drill bit
 

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I'm gathering this is a stack of items on one bolt...in the case of the pass side, two Heims w/ noted washers above and below, and a stock-GM-type spindle w/ the tapered hole bored out sandwiched in the middle? (No double-shear or anything.) If so, measure the total, go to a hardware or fastener store that sells grade-8 bolts and physically find something with a shank length (I don't think anyone will know what you're talking about if you say "grip" length) that's just shy of that amount, and yeah figure to use one nylock or other-type lock nut on the end (cutting excess beyond a few threads off for appearance 'cause there'll be a lot). Bore or drill and then (yes) ream the spindle hole as precise to the bolt and square to the surfaces as practical and crank the whole thing down tight to spec for the bolt. Rarely have I ever seen double-nutting used on anything pro-engineered, just a proper lock nut or safety-wire, and because you're using a number of flat surfaces compressed tightly together to help make it work, it's not the place for a stripper bolt. TECH must be a patient guy, I'd have said any chassis-builder who doesn't get "bind" needs to stay away from the business.
 

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Re: the chucking reamer, have your bolt in-hand before choosing a reamer to make sure you're going to get an appropriate actual clearance (I'd say a couple-thousanths) and that's a tool that has to go in a drill press at the minimum (mill is better) to hold it straight and the part to be reamed has to be clamped down tight with surfaces square to the hole. If you don't have those machines you could drill to 1/64th undersize then find your way through with an adjustable reamer that tapers out to size using a hand drill big enough to fit it. Cast/forged spindles may not have both sides, where the tapered holes are, machined flat from the factory...if not, seeing as how you're clamping parts together with that in the middle, they should be, which would be a trick to do as a spindle with its' odd shapes and angles can be a tough thing to clamp into such a certain place. You possibly, after boring to size, could instead use a piloted counterbore to cut a surface around a hole flat except 3/4" is a large size to find a pilot for although you could use a lathe to make a one-time-use aluminum plug to adapt to whatever pilot size. Would be a good time to have a buddy who'd a machinist, with all those tools and cutters on a shelf waiting to be used 'cause your costs are going to add up for stuff that may only be used once.
 

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Ya know what I'd do then considering 3/4 is a huge size for steering...have a shop make a bushing with the current hole size/taper on the outside and a half-inch hole inside, press it in to the steering knuckle, and then use half-inch heim joints. Easily done on a lathe in under an hour I'd think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Looking the kit over again and confirming what I have on hand to be correct.

I only need 5/8" holes/bolt and that is just slightly larger then the current taper on the spindles.

Still going to consult a machine shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Picked up my spindles from the machine shop with the 5/8" through hole.

Gas Circle Metal Fashion accessory Symbol


$100 which considering the "fun" this guy had (and I avoided) setting these up properly and drilling the 3 holes was worth every penny and I would repeat 10/10 times.

If I need to open up a lakewood bellhousing or such it is going to this guy.
 
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