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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SBC Edelbrock performer intake manifold has a hairline crack next to the heater hose outlet. Looks like the bib was overtightened and cracked it a bit. I get drops of water oozing out of the crack when the engine is warm.
Normally, I'd change out the manifold but It's complicated. The firewall on the 28 ford is notched for the engine, but the dizzy won't come out, so neither will the manifold, without pulling the engine. Can't get to the bell housing bolts, so the trans has to come with it, meaning the shifter, clutch linkage, e brake, etc. etc. Many days of work, for a very minor leak.
So, I'm considering some kind of sealer. Don't want to use that radiator stop leak crap. Maybe the stuff that is supposed to seal gasket leaks? Maybe a sealer applied directly, like JB weld but thinner/better/aluminum specific?
Anyone have a specific recommendation they have used?
 

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Crack

Aluma seal might work, Is there any way to get a tig torch in there, or maybe you could lower the engine by making the engine mount frame brackets removable, because I don't know how long I would trust sealer and changing blown head gaskets sounds like it would be even more FUN than pulling the intake on your ride. I've used a copper based block sealer by Jones Motor Purr out of California that worked for two years in my chevy truck's small block, It had been blowing white smoke and it stopped it. I have not seen thier products in Az for a while. Perri
 

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cracked intake manifold

I hate to say it, but the only reliable fix is going to be to get someone to either tig weld the crack, or use a mig welder with aluminum filler wire. Any sealants you put on there will not last very long. If you don't weld the crack, it will continue to spread due the crack propagation caused by the constant heating and cooling that the intake manifold experiences. If you are looking for a quick fix that will be temporary until you can get it welded, I would grind the area smooth and clean, and use ultra black rtv silicone(it has to be the ultra black, all the others kinds are garbage). You can buy it at just about any autoparts store, and apply it liberally, and let it cure for at least 24 hours before you start the car. It will hold for a while(maybe 6 months to a year).
 

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Moroso ceramic seal works well but the cooling system needs to be thoroughly cleaned first.

Bill

PS: I agree about the crack spreading, especially next to a pipe thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
help me fix it

I'm looking for a pretty near permanent fix, so the chemical additives and JB weld solution don't sound appealing. I have a friend who welds aluminum, more than one actually, but the one I talked to was afraid surface welding on the intake manifold may do more harm than good.
I'm going to repost this as an aluminum welding question and see what kind of advice I get there. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Lost in the 60's
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Well.....I would weld it and if that does not do it then you have no choice but replace the intake. It looks to me like you have nothing to loose so try the welding and see how it goes.
 

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We tig aluminium intakes ALL the time, for various reasons. There is not an issues with doing this. Think of all the EFI conversions done on aluminum intakes over the years to mount the bungs as an example.
 

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Doc here, :pimp:

There is a Product called Alumaloy, It comes in individual rods and can be applied with only a propane torch. It costs $1.88 a rod or about $40 a pound..

All that you need do is Clean the crack with a grinder, Heat the area, dab the rod in until it starts to flow, then fill the crack. Grind down and smooth it out with the grinder.

It fills as good or better than the cast..I have Not personally used it, but My Brother has on a Cracked Timing Chain cover on a Dodge, and it works!

Interested in seeing if it other's find the same results...

Here is the site , If you want to try it:

Aluminum Rods

If you do, post back with the results..

Hope It helps!

Doc :pimp:
 

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Its just metal,you're the boss
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Ive seen jb weld do some amazing things on one occasion and then fail miserably on others. i destroyed the magneto cover on my 4 wheeler and stuck it all back together with jb weld, even half remade a missing part of it with it, it leaked...but stayed together. we have tried jb weld on chain saw body's tho (magnesium) with poor results, but intense stress and vibration involved with a big saw used every day in the woods is probably partly to blame for that. i say try jb weld , v out the crack with a carbide burr. then Cross your fingers.
 

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Throw in a quart of sodium salicilate (aka egg keep). Pharmacies used to carry it and it is one of the ingredients in most stop leaks and block sealers. It's worth a try if you can't get at the crack and you don't want to pull the powertrain. But if you ever have a hose blow you'll never get the mess cleaned up once it dries. BUTCH.
 

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Try some of this. http://people.consolidated.net/cargochemical/prod_sealup.html
It is sodium silicate with copper in it. Here is an interesting read
where they tested it on the cooling system of a nuclear power plant.
http://sti.srs.gov/fulltext/ms2004762/ms2004762.pdf

One thing about it,if there is anti-freeze in the system it is a waste of time.
I have seen it seal a mitsubishi 2.6 that the water would blow out of the radiator so hard it would hit the hood when the engine was revved with the cap off.
 

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38 Special

Amloly works great on all kinds of aluminum from refrigerator evaporator tubing to thick aluminum like motorcycle casings to patching holes in beer cans. I bought some at a car show and sure glad I did. You sure can't loose much.
 

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I use JB weld to attach all sorts of custom fittings to aluminum heads and intakes and the stuff works greatr.I would start by finding the end of the crack and drilling it through to stop the crack.Then clean the inside of the cracked area as well as possible and use a die grinder to V the outside.Apply JB weld to the inside of the crack including the threaded surfaces of the hose fitting{or plug if you are eliminating the hose} then install the fitting and plug with JB on the threads,then ally more JB weld on the outside of the crack.I did this to an Oldmobile 455 block that cracked straight down the sides from freeze up,and it held fine for years.After all is said and done,a litle stop leak might be cheap insurance especially if you take road trips with the truck.This situation sounds similar to something a friend of mine in Jersey asked me about recently.I guess it isnt sch an uncommon problem.
 

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poncho62 said:
Try JB weld...............although, it probably wont last.
I also recommend JB Weld. I had a crack develop on a heater hose connection. I routed out the crack with a Dremel and applied some JB Weld. I then installed the hose nipple with sealant so that I did not have to torque it down too much. My repair has lasted many years now, maybe close to 10 years now. It's not show quality, but it works!

See:


Good luck, Ed
www.edgesz28.com
 

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well, I strongly recommend you do NOT aluminum MIG it...unless the welder really knows what he's doing...in my opinion if you want it fixed good then try to find someone who can and will TIG it...there are some truly amazing things that you can do with a TIG welder...good luck :thumbup:
 
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