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Has anyone sprayed with HOK paint in their homemade booths? If so what were your results? I'm looking to paint my car with their Kandy Base Coat which should be a lot easier to spray than a true candy. Also, it looks like I'll be spraying right around mid summer, in Georgia. I'm worried about humidity even though the slow reducer they sell supposedly is good for high temps high humidity. What do you all think? Should I wait until it gets a little cooler or would I be ok?

Another point: In my last thread about homemade spray booths, someone mentioned using a dehumidifier but I don't think it would be too safe to have it running in the booth while I'm spraying. Besides, I doubt it would be able to keep up with the airflow through the booth. If I did use a dehumidifier after I spray coupled with the slow reducer do you think I stand a chance of a nice finish?
Thanks for the advice!!!

[ May 10, 2003: Message edited by: bmech211 ]</p>
 

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yeah very good point the with dehumidifier...something about electric, and the potential for sparks in a confined area with highly flamable vapors just doesn't seem too safe.

reminds me of when I was in the marine corps and some guy tried to suck up a bunch of gasoline he spilled with his shop vac...needless to say he is no longer with us.
 

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Depending on your weather at the time of laying down the paint will tell you what reducer to use. Just buy some cotton sheets, wash them and take them directly out of the washer damp and use them as tops and sides for your home made paint booth with a sealed fan at one end. The damp cotton will act as a filter without restricting airflow to choking point. I use HOK regularly and havn't had a problem yet.

HK
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by Halloweenking:
<strong>Depending on your weather at the time of laying down the paint will tell you what reducer to use. Just buy some cotton sheets, wash them and take them directly out of the washer damp and use them as tops and sides for your home made paint booth with a sealed fan at one end. The damp cotton will act as a filter without restricting airflow to choking point. I use HOK regularly and havn't had a problem yet.

HK</strong><hr></blockquote>

Thanks Halloweenking for the advice. When you say "use them as tops and sides for the booth" do you mean use the damp cotton sheets as the walls and not clear plastic sheeting? Or, can I place the cotton sheets over my furnace filters?

This may really be a dumb question but please humor me as I want this go as smoothly as possible.
 

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The plastic works, but has to be very clean and rubbed down with static dryer sheets so it doesn't attract all the dirt in your yard or garage. I just use the cotton sheets, nothing else. The filters are alright, but sheets are easier, cheeper and reuseable for at least 5-10 paint jobs depending on if your spray pattern is controlled or like a raped ape. You can even get your wife or a alterations shop to sew them together so all you have to do is lay it over your booth frame after the spin cycle. Have a blast with it.

HK
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Originally posted by Halloweenking:
<strong>The plastic works, but has to be very clean and rubbed down with static dryer sheets so it doesn't attract all the dirt in your yard or garage. I just use the cotton sheets, nothing else. The filters are alright, but sheets are easier, cheeper and reuseable for at least 5-10 paint jobs depending on if your spray pattern is controlled or like a raped ape. You can even get your wife or a alterations shop to sew them together so all you have to do is lay it over your booth frame after the spin cycle. Have a blast with it.

HK</strong><hr></blockquote>

Good Deal HK, will do!!!
Hate to bother you again but what do you use for lighting?
 

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Its no bother, happy to help if I have the time to jump on the site.

If your outside, I doubt you'll need light on a brite day, at least I don't, but I wear sunglasses at 8pm. If your garage is not well lit you can buy a set of those telescoping lamps from lows or home depot for $50 that house painters use. They work well. Another option would be to score 2-4 old overhead lamps from a warehouse or store that use the long tube lights and attach 2 to the top frame of your booth and two to the sides, that should brighten up your world. It would down right blind me. Make sure to seal them off with some plexiglass so the rising gases don't catch a spark. The telescoping lamps are already sealed.

HK
 
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