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Hello,

I'm closing in on the body work and will prob be painting within the next month. My thermostat usually in the winter doesn't get below 50 in the garage. Other than that it stays around 50 to 55 without heating.

My question is if i heat up the panels with a heat lamp, will the outside air maybe around 40-50 degrees allow my paint to cure?

I set up a positive pressure make-shift booth so it will be blowing in the cold air. Thanks

Chris
 

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Painting temp

I live in a cold climate and painting in the winter can be a pain. I would want to keep the temp above 50 if possible. You could run into adhesion and curing problems. After putting countless hours into a project don't skimp on the finale. Read all the paint recommendations on the system you are using. Be sure to use the correct reducer for the temp range. Good luck.
 

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i've only used ppg, so i know that their psheet says the surface being painted needs to be in the 70's for the solvent to pop. I painted my truck last january, ran some heat, i didn't want to waste my paint. know what i'm sayin'?

this stuff hardens by evaporation of the solvent, if it's cool, the solvent doesn't evaporate as quickly if at all.
wheres BarryK or MartinSr when you need them?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys for replying.

Yea i'm really starting to get worried. Kinda need it done for a deadline and refuse not to try and paint in a booth. The whole point of my project was to keep it as " home made " as possible.

The guy at the jobber told me to get one of those torpedo heaters and blow it into my garage through the intake fan. Would that pose any problems with the butane or whatever , as far as effecting the paint? He said it may also give me a headache , but it would work. I'm using lesonal paint btw. Thanks
 

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If you are using proper respiratory protestion, one of those heaters should not give you a headache. The p sheets I've looked at for PPG show a minimum of 60 degrees. I think I might use a heater for a while to warm up the whole garage and keep it that way for a couple of hours. Then use it to heat your makeup air as you spray. If you start with the garage nice and toasty, it will take a while to cool down and your paint should be dust free. After that, you could run the heater some more to keep the garage warm for a couple of hours.
 

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With the primers and 2K primers you can get away with painting in cool weather if you have the Patience to let each coat flash long enough and the time to wait for drying.

The exception is NOT with epoxies at lower temps.

The most important thing is if heat is involved the metal temp must be warmer than the air.

If metal temp is 40 you paint than fire heat up to 60 with a heater
if its paint or clear you will not be happy.
Better to let metal temp warm up to 50-60 and out side air be 40, you will get better result.
 

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Here is a quote from the PPG Refinish Training Manual in the fundamentals section.....

"....most dry times and pot life are given at 70-75 degrees F at 50% relative humidity....every 15 degree increase will cut that time in half....every 15 degree decrease will double the time....NOTE: All product cross linking and curing in 2K catalyzed products slows significantly or stops below 60 degrees F."

I know the below 60 degree thing is true as it has happened to us...turned Thermostat to 50 after priming with 2k primer...came in to soft primer the next day.

I'm sure most any brand will be affected the same way as most catalysts have the same main ingredient.

Jake
www.geocities.com/ndjakester/
 

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jakesbackyard said:
Here is a quote from the PPG Refinish Training Manual in the fundamentals section.....

"....most dry times and pot life are given at 70-75 degrees F at 50% relative humidity....every 15 degree increase will cut that time in half....every 15 degree decrease will double the time....NOTE: All product cross linking and curing in 2K catalyzed products slows significantly or stops below 60 degrees F."

I know the below 60 degree thing is true as it has happened to us...turned Thermostat to 50 after priming with 2k primer...came in to soft primer the next day.

I'm sure most any brand will be affected the same way as most catalysts have the same main ingredient.

Jake
www.geocities.com/ndjakester/
**********************************************
Isocyanate's slow below 70 but dormant not till around 48.
Site like that they must side on a conservative figure.
 
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What I generally do in the winter is, run my salamander heater in the garage for a couple of days prior. I have one of the thermostats that plugs in the wall outlet. I set the thermostat at about 70 deg, and keep the garage at that temp for atleast 2 days prior to painting. That brings up the temp of the surface to be painted. If you are going to paint a whole car, it will take some time for you to warm it up if it is too cool.
 
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