Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
699 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just recently went to a car show and saw a car that had a wood dash with an extreamly shiney finish. It was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen. When I asked the owner how he did that he told me he bought it pre-maid and installed it that way.

Does anyone know how to duplicate this extreamly shiny beautiful finish on a piece of wood?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
First thing is to build a stable wood base. Those burl wood finsihes are made from very thin (1/64" to 1/128" veneers) glued to stable wood base with a permanent hide or urethane glue. The veneers must then be further stablized by saturating the completely with a clear epoxy. You can get a penetrating "rotten wood" repair epoxy liquid at your home center. Once the wood is soaked in epoxy, then lay on a couple of coats of clear epoxy as a sanding base. Block sand the epoxy to a perfectly flat, flawless finish. Finally paint it with catalyzed clear urethane and polish that as you would a fine auto finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
Willys, I have been working some dash inserts for the past two weeks and am not having much fun yet. The wood is some exotic South American stuff that in its natural state is beautiful. Sawing, planeing, and sanding has been totally different. The chips and dust are obnoxious to say the least. I have been using a clear finish that has worked well for me in the past, but not having much luck on this wood.. I have to wait 24 hours between coats and am up to # 10. I even wet sanded with 600 trying to get a smoother finish. Now I'm to the point of wet sanding with 2000 and planning on spraying the last coat vice the old foam brush. I guess my question would be could I safely make the last coat catalyzed clear urethane?

Trees
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
What wood is it? I just did a project with blood wood (looks just like it's name - the plank I got was a full 1.25" thick planed, 13" wide, and 6' long - HATED to cut it up!) and it was so full of oil that it clogged sand paper instantly. Is your wood very oily (heavy and cool to the touch)? If so, finishing it is a tough job. If your coating is not drying properly, you might want ot strip it and wash it very thoroughly with lacquer thinner to de-oil the top layer. Then your clear will dry and adhere properly.

Best finish for auto service is a clear epoxy resin. Go to Home Depot and find the stuff they sell for repairing rotted wood. It penetrates very well and hardens very hard which some clear epoxies don't do. A couple coats of this on properly de-oiled wood will sand very easily, won't shrink like varnishes inevitably will, and will accept urethane clear coat like a dream.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
Willys, sounds like the same wood. My son is the wood man and he recommended it and had what I needed. Yes, I first thought it was oil soaked, but was a characteristic of the wood, not an application. It loaded up the mitre saw blade on the first cut and I had to clean it after each cut. Have not seen a bug or insect in the shop since!! Before I strip it down, I'll try shooting the clear just to see what will happen.

Thanks,
Trees
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
Sounds good. No need to cause yourself more work than necessary. I understand the natives use that stuff as framing and deck wood 'cause NOTHING will attack it. Can you imagine a pool deck of blood wood?
 

·
1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Willys36, where did you get you wood? My 75 dash is cracking and lifting off the base wood. Jags use elm burl which is hard to find, I wonder if the epoxy you spoke of would reseat my venieer.

Thanks
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
Willys, I shot two pieces of my blood wood today with clear coat and in three hours, I installed the first piece!! Don't know why I never thought about doing this. Thanks for the tip!!

Trees
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
I used a base wood of walnut and got my walnut burl veneer from a mail order outfit (Constantine's maybe - been about 10 years so don't recall which one). I glued the veneer on wiht white carpenter's glue with a layer of brown craft paper and pywood clamped on top. IT has held up fairly well but it has recently started to unlaminate too. I have been swabing a little yellow carpenter's glue behind the loose spots and taping it down. Works pretty well. I will be pulling my dash out for a new set of gauges and at that time I will redo the veneer as I described above w/ epoxy adhesives and sealers and catalyzed urethane finish.

On your jag, the new yellow glues are very good and should repair the lifted wood well. I am assuming the wood is still there, just cracked and lifting in spots like mine is. Just work some glue thoroughly behind the loose sopt and figure a way to apply pressure - tape on the edges, a 2x4 wedged between the seat and the bad spot on the dash, etc. If you do need replacement wood (just realize it is tough to get a match), try

.<a href="http://www.constantines.com/" target="_blank">Constantine's home page</a>

They claim to have the world's largest selection of veneers.

[ May 03, 2003: Message edited by: [email protected] ]</p>
 

·
1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Willys36:
Thanks man, what a cool site. They don't have my veneer but I'm going out looking for another Series 2 dash and I think I might try using either quited maple stained with a slight yellow tint, or that Kewzinga stuff looked cool too.

Thanks again
Mark
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
I think elm is becoming extinct due to Dutch Elm Disease. I seem to recall that American chestnut is already extinct due to disease. My 2001 Constantine's catalog does have a couple of listings for elm burl,

Part #60S8, 15"x30" 4 piece book matched table top, $37.00.

Part #V22 Premium elm burl, $5.00/sq.ft.

They also list several other types of wood in fancy burls and crotches. Walnut burl would be a very nice substiture for elm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I have recently seen a couple of instrument panels in private aircraft that had beautiful Burl and South American Rosewood panels. These weren't just thin laminates, but formed and polished works of art.
I've never talked to them and maybe they wouln't even be interested in doing a car dash (...let alone the cost!)but, when I am at that stage, I am going to talk to them. Their web site is: <a href="http://www.pfluegers.com" target="_blank">www.pfluegers.com</a>
If I had the woodworking talent of Willys, I would consider doing it myself (beautiful train!!)
'40Tudor
 

·
1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Willys36:
Nice job on the locomotive!!!! You were talking about yellow glues to repair my dash, do you know the drying time on these? Also do you need to pull the dash to do it? I'm looking for a spare now so I can do a complete restoration on it but getting the dash with all it's cracks back in order would be really cool. Any recomendations on finish? I'm sure things have improved since 1975 when mine was done.

Regards
Mark
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
The yellow carpenter's glues set up very fast - can handle them within half an hour. No need to remove dash, just figure out ways to press the bulges flat 'til the glue sets. Use tape, sticks wedged between the front seat and the glued spot, anything that will hold it flat for a few minutes.

As far as finihing goes, read first page of this thread. Coats of clear epoxy to stabilize, seal and level the surface, color sand to mirror smoothness, then clear coat w/ 3 coats of catalyzed urethane clear coat and polish will give you a show winning surface that will last a very long time.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top