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I have read, and read, a lot of the tips and tutorials listed on this board and other websites on block sanding and filling.

I expect to start the first bit of filling soon.

What techniques should I use, for blocking and filling on my rear quarter panel? There are multiple shapes on this panel, and I don't want to muddy the lines or round the lines where they should be sharp. Nor do I want to have bad contours where two different shapes intersect.

I had thought the best way might be, to fill and sand one contour at a time. I don't really know where to start though. Should I start with the small detail sections, or should I start with the larger areas and finish with the smaller sections?

For example would I work the larger area of the quarter panel, then go to the fender edge (flare line fold) and then do the scallop and the raised sections around it? Or the reverse order.

I have tentatively set aside 2 months to do this work, hopefully that is enough time.

One other question, if I spend enough time blocking, sanding, filling, and finish off blocking with a good finishing compound, will I/should I still give it a coat of high build primer, then block that?
 

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Work the large shapes first then the detail areas, get the major sections of that quarter straight then tune in your areas around the scoop and flare.
 

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Yeah, perfect your filler work and use a guidecoat on the filler to see any highs and lows, but you'll still need to block more during the surfacer stage. Finish off your filler to a minimum of 180 before priming, 220 or 320 is even better. Bob
 

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baddbob said:
Yeah, perfect your filler work and use a guidecoat on the filler to see any highs and lows, but you'll still need to block more during the surfacer stage. Finish off your filler to a minimum of 180 before priming, 220 or 320 is even better. Bob
I am a beginner at this. Just finished the bodywork on my 71 C-10 pickup, and have all my parts in epoxy, some in build primer.

When I mentioned to the salesman at my paint shop [who has been very helpful] that I was doing some guide coating on my filler where I shaved the marker lights, he was quite surprised. He told me I was working the filler too long. He advised me to quit working the filler so much that after 80 grit I was just putting waves in it. I took that advice with a grain of salt... and continued to use guide coat.

Then I got fixing my doors. From the lower body line down the doors were just full of little imperfections that I could feel but not see. So after I straightened the bottom edge of the door, I laid out my filler. I would get the whole area to a point I thought was good, using guide coat and paper to 180. Then I would wet it with W&GR and examine. It was full of waves every time. So then I thought of what my paint guy had said about stopping at 80 grit. I re-skim coated this area and got it flat with 36, then 80, and stopped there, this is with a 14" or so Hutchins board. Paint rep had told me build primer would fill the 80 grit surface so I tried it. After one good coat of build and a blocking my 80 grit is 95% gone and my panel is flat. I think it will be ready for paint after one more build and block.

This would obviously not work on detail areas. And as my skills increase I may be able to block large relatively flat areas into the finer papers, we shall see... :mwink: But for now the bottoms of my doors are flat and I am happy.
 
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