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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a good way to air check the reverse input drum? The ATSG book says to air check the reverse input after the clutch pack is installed, to make sure that the lip seals were not damaged during installation. I can hold an air nozzle up inside the drum, and blow air through the square hole, and the piston moves, but I suspect that isn;t an accurate check. Air blows everywhere since the hole isn;t sealed off.
How do you guys go about it?
Thanks.
 

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my air gun has a steel tube about 8 inches long with a curve at the end. This is made from a steel brake line of 3/16 inch diameter. A common brake line size in American cars.

I can fit the end of this device into the area easier of the drum in question. I apply air for an air check.

Other wise you will need to assemble the drum onto the pump stator for an air check
 

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Thanks Crosley. Yeah, that works pretty good. I had thought about turning up a stepped plug, with O-rings, and a port to hook the airline to. The piston actuates when I blow air in through the square hole, but with the bleed hole you still get a slight amount of air. How do you determine if the air is bypassing the lip seals or if its just coming through the bleed hole? I did step down the bleed hole per the manual.
Thanks again, T00lmanii
 

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t00lmanii said:
Thanks Crosley. Yeah, that works pretty good. I had thought about turning up a stepped plug, with O-rings, and a port to hook the airline to. The piston actuates when I blow air in through the square hole, but with the bleed hole you still get a slight amount of air. How do you determine if the air is bypassing the lip seals or if its just coming through the bleed hole? I did step down the bleed hole per the manual.
Thanks again, T00lmanii

I always down the factory bleed hole in the reverse input piston.

I peen the hole down about half or install a small plug with a hole in it.

You either pull the piston out and look at the seals for a roll over or try to see if the bleed hole is the only leak.
 
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