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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I was wondering what kind of hydraulic roller cam would work best with a 1982 L83 350 2 bolt. Stock internals (Found out forged pistons came in the vette the motor came out of) with trick flow 2.02/160 aluminum heads, edelbrock performer air gap intake manifold, aluminum radiator, dual electric 12" fans. Please list part numbers and brand names so I can do a little research and some ebay shopping.

Thank you
SGT Kirk
 

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Hotrodders.com Moderator
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Couple of quick Q's. Do you know what the compression ratio of the engine is, is the car an automatic or stick. If it's an automatic what size converter and what size gears does the car have. Also the approximate weight of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
WheelBase 2489 mm / 98 in Length 4706 mm / 185.5 in
Height 1222 mm / 48.1 in Width 1752 mm / 69 in
Prod Coupe : 18684
Collector : 6759 Weight 1517 kg / 3345 lbs

Moteur / Engine - L83
Configuration V8 Valvetrain 16 Valve OHV
Displacement 5737 cc / 350 cu in Bore 101.6 mm / 4 in
Power 200 hp @ 5200 RPM Stroke 88.4 mm / 3.48 in
Compression Ratio 9.0:1 Torque -- Nm / -- ft lbs @ -- RPM
Power/Liter 34.86 Power/Weight 0.13
Performance
Top Speed KmH / mph 0 - 30 mph NA
0 - ¼ mile seconds 0 - 60 mph seconds

This is stock for a 82 corvette. Thats what the motor is but I'm putting it in 1986 camaro. Its an automatic 700R4 not sure of the converter or the weight you guess is as good as mine. I'm currently in Iraq so finding stats in my garage at home is a little difficult. I wanna run 3.55 gears or so. Not sure if I should go posi since its gonna be pretty much a summer driver.

SGT Kirk
 

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Bench racer
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141 Posts
Here's my 2 cents...

These are general recommendations! The car, engine, and what you want it to do are huge factors in picking the "right" cam. I would strongly recommend you e-mail Comp Cams with your setup and ask what they think would be best. The more accurate information you give them the better they can help.

If I were chosing on what you've said here and wanted a hydraulic roller I'd pick something like this:

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=LUN-60110&autoview=sku

Seeing as this is a retro-fit application for a hydraulic roller and it's going to be a summer driver you might want to consider a solid roller. The new cams don't require anywhere near as much adjustment as the old ones and it lets you get very steep opening and closing rates. If you dont already have the Hyd roller lifters the cost to buy the Mech rollers is the same and the cams are the same cost. In a heavy street car ('86 camaro~3600LBS) with an automatic you'll want as much torque as you can get.

This would be a good choice:
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=CCA-12-700-8&autoview=sku



What these cams have in common is a short overall duration and more importantly a steep lift curve. The Lunati Hyd roller listed first specs at 262/270 advertised and 211/219 @.050. The Comp cams Mech roller specs at 268/268 advertised and 224/224 @.050. Both of these cams will behave well in a street car because the advertised duration is pretty short. This is to a large extent what dictates throttle response and vacuum. While they both have a long duration @.050 relative to the advertised rate. This means a quick valve opening ramp. Even though the Lunati shown here is one of the most agressive lift curves available in a Hyd roller it can't touch the Mech roller.

In an ideal world a valve would go from closed to open imediatly and then from open to closed just as fast. The laws of physics don't let this happen because of the weight of the valvetrain parts and the limitations of the springs. The closer you can get to that though the better.
 
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