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i swear i've done everything messed around with the hinges, tweaked the doors around, i don't know what else to try. this problem is starting to piss me off, my car is nowhere near completed but it irritates me having to look at the doors all f*cked up
 

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my doors are the same way.....never been in a wreck, are totally straight, and still dont line up right. i think its because the hinges are gonneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee. I rebuilt them but i think the actual metal is too far gone.

Its gonna suck having to plunk out over $200 for new ones....unless i can find fatter bushings and/or pins.....? i dont even know where to look for those though....
 

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doors not lining up

One the older cars (20's - 30's) you have to shim the body mounts differently to get the doors to properly line up. I have a 31 Olds and have a manual for shimming the the body to get the correct alignment. It is basically using thicker or thinner spacers to manipulate the body.
 

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Yeah, usually you can put some shims under the cowl area to raise the doors, different thickness shims will change the angle of the cowl. I agree on posting some pictures. Make sure your body is square by taking some cross measurements through the interior. In extreme cases with a twisted door you'll need to cut a slice through the frame of the door then adjust and weld it back up. A 28 Essex-cool! I've got the remains of an Essex sedan body or maybe it's Whippit? waiting for a Rat Rod project.
 

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A 28 Essex likely has wood frame for the body and doors. Almost impossible to get that 80 year old warped rotted wood to do anything. If that's the case you will be miles ahead if you replace all the wood with square and rectangular steel tubing, starting with the body then fitting the doors being careful to measure, measure, measure, square, then measure again.
 

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Doesn't that Essex have the single 18-14" long heavy hinge on each door mounted at the rear? The Hudsons, also "suicide" doored, of that era were heavily wood structured but the Essex was pretty much a steel structured car with steel doors. They did have, as all cars at the time a full wood structure in the roof, in this case a pair of long contoured beams running from the rear of the roof just over the top from the rear glass up to the front header panel. These were not small but rather 4X6 or so cut and tapered and rolled on the sides to give the top a nice finish.
The Hudson-Essex Company saved a lot of money on manufacturing these cars as almost every panel inside the body is double stamped to allow use on either side of the car so only one stamping die was necessary per piece. The frame crossmembers are also used with varying hole configurations in different places on the frame.
The rear springs are mounted at an angle wider at the rear than the front in an effort to limit body sway in turns.
The radiator shells have inside controlled louvers over the radiator to control temperature during cold weather.
The frames are heavy and straight and were favored for many years by race car builders since they were long enough to cut down and strong enough to last. Many early Model T & A Ford bodied race cars and hot rods were mounted on Essex rails, the Offenhauser T roadster and the Niekamp 29 Roadster for example.

Door fit on these cars is accomplished by shimming the body at the mounting points. Don't forget that suicide door adjustmenst are made opposite of front hinged doors to accomplish the same movement.
 
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