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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hate my job now, so Im looking to do something I like. A friend suggested becomming a professional driver. For the past month or so I've been looking into it. However, All I can really find is truck driving schools and 1-2 day race schools.
What I'd like to do is be a driver for something like C&D or R&T or some magizine along those lines, or even a car company with the same tests. Basically a test driver for new cars I guess. But Im having trouble finding ANY information on it. Anybody a prof. driver, or know anything about it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea... Been there done that... Maybe thats where I need to look into though? Maybe I just dont know how to apply those schools to a job? Im lost.... help me...:smash: :(

Im thinking there's something like wyotech for drivers I guess?
 

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Grillin Randy
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I suggest getting on the phone and calling the human resource departments of the magazine and car companies that you wish to work for and ask them what the qualifications are for a test driver.

fourbyfourblazer said:
You might have to have a background in journalism or something that. Maybe need a degree to work for the magazine.
I would assume fourbyfourblazer is correct, you probably need a degree in journalism to work for a magazine.

I'll bet that to test cars for an automobile manufacturer you would most likely need a degree in engineering.
 

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Kenneth Howard hates you...
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CrashFarmer2 said:
I'll bet that to test cars for an automobile manufacturer you would most likely need a degree in engineering.
One would think that...unless they work for an Automobile Manufacturer:D Its really not as scientific as one would think.
Later,
WEIMER
 

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Kenneth Howard hates you...
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I work for Honda Mfg

I could transfer from assembly dept to VQD(Vehicle Quality Dept) where they do all of the final testing on the cars, if they had an opening. Or I could go to New Model Dept, to develop and test the upcoming model....Or better yet I could go to Honda R&D(research and development) to do testing on other manufacturers cars....Its all about if there is an opening or not and clock numbers(seniority)
Later,
WEIMER
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
So you're tellin me its all about seniority and openings (at least more so than school)... is that true for mostly all of the industry? Or is weimer in his own special case scenario?

edit
GhettoJet, you gotta goto school for everything else nowadays, so i figured, you'd have to goto school for something like this also :(

CrashFarmer2, you're probably right with your suggestion on calling... I wish I wasnt so incredibly lazy though.
Degree in engineering eh? hmm...

fourbyfourblazer, Its really not that important to me to work for a magazine, I was just using them as examples of what I wanted to do I guess.
 

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Tazz
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I concur with Weimer..

people who once worked the assembly line are x-line people and they go by seniority to CAA or QC and do our test driving of the new products. So yes it goes strictly by seniority not schooling except everybody I work with has some college, 2yr degrees and 4yr degrees all working together on the line...some of those people are pulled aside and offered supervisor jobs, they must have at least a 2yr degree. The only qualification our drives must have is an OHIO drivers license.


Tazz


Rat Rods Rule!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Follow up...

Well, once again, everybody here was right, I figured I'd post this incase anybody ever does a search, and to let everybody know I had my question answered. :)

From www.racingschools.com

"How do I get your job"
By Motortrend's Mac Demere, Senior Road Test Editor

Yes, being Motor Trend's Senior Road Test Editor is great fun--most of the time. Though it can be a lot of work--writing an interesting comparison on V-6 pickups is no picnic and a summer photo shoot that goes to 9 p.m. is draining--there are few jobs I'd swap it for. I'd bet Jeff Gordon says the same thing. No job is gloriously fun all the time and I'm certain Gordon agrees with that.

Though a key ingredient, driving is only a small component of being road test editor at Motor Trend. Writing ability is far more important. All Motor Trend staffers are either writers or photographers (or both!): Nobody is just a driver. Though my resume contains a dozen auto racing victories, and appearances in the Daytona 24 Hours and NASCAR Southwest Tour Series, I am a writer first.

If you desire a job with an auto magazine, the most important single thing I can say to you is: Develop multiple skills. Become proficient in as many of these as possible: writing, photography, high performance driving, video production, technical knowledge.

Specifically, get either a journalism degree with an engineering minor, or an engineering degree with a journalism minor. (To become a tester for a car company, an engineering degree is a must.) Choose a university with a strong journalism department and a daily student newspaper. Work at the paper and get at least one article published each week! A basis in Japanese or German would be helpful. And take some TV courses!

Next, develop your driving and mechanical skills by getting involved in racing. Though other areas of the sport may be as good or better, the program with the easiest access is the Sports Car Club of America's autocross program. (The least notable item on my resume is a SCCA Solo II Divisional Championship.) Investigate a mechanics training program at a racing school. At the least, enroll in an auto mechanics course at the local community college and read everything Steve Smith Autosports and Classic Motorbooks sells.

Write for anybody who'll take your words: Cover high school sports for your local newspaper. Sell articles and photographs to smaller automotive publications.

A copy of "Careers for Car Buffs" by Richard and Mary Lee (847/679-5500) may offer additional insight.

If you're interested in working for car magazines you need to...

1. Develop your writing skills. Writing is fully three-quarters of the job. Smoky burnouts and top speed testing account for perhaps two percent. Get a journalism degree with an engineering minor or an engineering degree with a journalism minor. Either way, write for your college paper.

2. Develop your photography skills. Most of the minor magazines require the writers to also be accomplished photographers. In fact it's often the other way around...the editor was a photographer first and had to learn to write to get/keep the job.

3. Develop your mechanical skill. A lot of car writers don't know what goes on inside a car. I'm far from a mechanic or engineer, but my racing experience combines with what we Southerners call "book learnin'" means I'm the more than adequately knowledgeable. Enroll in an auto mechanics course at the local community college. Read everything Steve Smith Autosports and Classic Motorbooks sells.

4. Develop your driving skill. The least notable item on my resume is a Divisional Solo II (aka Autocross) Championship...it's so far down the line I usually don't even mention (or remember, for that matter) it. But it sure would be striking on a resmume of someone applying for an intern position. And autocross (and bracket drag racing) doesn't require anything more than a well-maintained street car. Attend a racing school, check out www.racingschools.com for information on over 100 schools throughout America and Europe.

5. Since you've got to be in school anyway, learn Japanese or, less preferably, German. And take some TV courses.

6. Start now to try to write for anybody who'll take your words...a student newspaper, a website, a local auto section.

We do have a very few intern positions. Pay is low, living in LA is expensive, and you wind up doing a lot of grunt jobs: No top speed testing or shepherding cover girls around.

I hope I've helped.

Article is provided courtesy of Mr. Mac Demere, Senior Road Test Editor.



...wow, so much to do...Guess I better get started eh?
 
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