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I need to sand a 1984 corvette it has the worst paint job I've ever seen. Since most of the body is plastic and fiberglass would wet or dry sanding be better.
 

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They each have their place. Wet sanding is desirable as a last step before painting. Dry sanding is usually done in the primering stages building up to the final step before painting. Some people will substitute wet sanding for dry in the primering step to eliminate sanding dust. Wet sanding has it's own problems with the mess it creates though. One is neither better or worse than the other IMO, they both have merit.

Vince
 

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Wet sanding with finer grits seems to glide smoother and paper lasts longer...both make messes....I like wet sanding better.....the end is usually in sight and you can feel how smooth your work is. In line air sanding 150 psi full tilt, dry sanding with sharp 36 grit over a bunch of bondo is always fun too..... Makes a huge mess though.
 

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Wet or dry

WET. Don't wanna clog the paper. Grit depends on your intent. Lower for stock removal and finer for final prep, and finer yet for finish coats.
 

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With the right paper, dry sanding is a breeze but DUSTY. There is paper made especially for dry sanding that does not clog up. I just keep a shop rag handy to wipe the paper ever now and then to clean it off. Wet sanding, although still messy, does not leave a dusty residue in the whole shop, but will take some scrubbing to get it off. If the residue is on the floor and allowed to dry, just taking a hose to it will not wash it off. You have to scrub it to get it broke loose. If you wet sand a car, this wet residue will settle into nooks and crannies that you cannot get to. I would say if you want to wet sand, wet sand parts off of the car. When sanding the complete car, then dry sand it. It's easier to blow and wipe dust than it is to scrub sludge. My $.02 worth.

Kevin
 

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SPI Thug
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i wet sand everything. but dont leave the mess on it. i have a sanding area with a rinse sprayer set up ( bug sprayer nozle on a small hose). when done the car is clean. just have to dry it off and it's ready for w/g remover and the next coat.
 

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I typically wet sand "Color sand" the top coat !

For sanding primer or epoxy I use 320 grit followed by 600
grit. "Dry"

When your wet sanding a top coat you can use a mix of 50/50 water and
rubbing alcohol. The alcohol in the water really helps keep the sludge down.
It kind of cleans as it goes.

Using the 50/50 mix doubles as a cleaner so there is no need to use a wax and
grease remover as its built right in to the mix

X711
 

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hi guys..

the above members said every things and did not left anything for me to say :D anyway...

dry sanding
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1. dry sanding will create dust in your workshop
2. dry sanding is not healthy becuase of the dust flying in the air
3. dry sanding will create a heat
4. dry sanding will not let your sand paper last long
5. dry sanding will create a deeper scraches in your car surface
6. the good things in dry sanding are:
a. will not create rust
b. will not spoil the papers which covered your car window

wet sanding
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1. wet sanding will not create dust... but the dust go with the water
2. wet sanding is more healthy..
3. wet sanding will create cool sanding
4. wet sanding will let your sand paper last longer
5. wet sanding will give you smooth finish without scraches
6. the bad things in wet sanding are:
a. will create rust when you reach the steel surface
b. will spoil the paper and masking tape
c. will let the water hide under your masking tape

I like both above ways :thumbup:

wish u all the best
 
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