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Yes.
Flatheads are cool and can be kept stupid simple if you just want a reliable power unit.
I feel the same way about large 2 strokes.

Underpowered by todays standards. But reliable and easy to service(which you do often).

I dont know if its the same engine. The belts make me think it is. But here is one running.
 

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Old(s) Fart
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Old(s) Fart
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That has to be one of the coolest things I have ever heard/seen! Never had a clue they were used in tanks. Great piece ov information there!
OK, while not related to the Caddy flathead (appologies to the OP), THIS tank engine will definitely blow your mind.


 

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1964 Thunderbird, 390 FE
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Cadillac flathead V8 engine from approx 1937 to 1948.
Possibly the worlds forst crate motor as it was used extensively during WW2 in numerous stationary, marine and mobile tasks, including service in tanks and landing barges.
USA tanks had 2 engines coupled, while not found in service due to the end of WW2, Australia and refined a 3 engine tank configuration that was awesome also.

For folks interested in these engine for use in hot rods please see on YouTube my series of short video's that will help satisfy and more curiosity you may have regarding these engines.

Google search:
Cadflat Video Series - YouTube
or

Subscribe if you LIKE...
 

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The Aussie three Caddy setup appears to use something similar to the Chrysler five bank engine. The twin Caddy V-8s used in the M5 Stuart and M24 Chaffe light tanks used separate Hydramatic (four speed) transmissions -- one for each motor. They fed power into a differential that allowed steering by braking. It could run on one engine due to the differentials (I'm assuming it would use two). Just think of it as taking two rear axles and linking them with a short tube and axle between them, and axle with large drum brake on either end....
 
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The Aussie three Caddy setup appears to use something similar to the Chrysler five bank engine. The twin Caddy V-8s used in the M5 Stuart and M24 Chaffe light tanks used separate Hydramatic (four speed) transmissions -- one for each motor. They fed power into a differential that allowed steering by braking. It could run on one engine due to the differentials (I'm assuming it would use two). Just think of it as taking two rear axles and linking them with a short tube and axle between them, and axle with large drum brake on either end....
I always thought that that kind of differential braking was cool.
 

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There is a lot of peripherial history relating to these engines that has not be published much.
Edmunds built heads and intakes for these engines, as did Burrell and I think Mallory did a twin point Dizzy as well if my memory serves me right.
There were also solid lifters available, much of these improvements were driven by the need for performance in the tanks when matched to the opposition of the era...
 

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@fiftyv8
Cadillac introduced it's first V-8 flathead engine in 1914. It was a 315 CI displacement with 3.125" bore and 5.125" stroke. As did all engines of the era, it had a flat plane crankshaft.

In 1924, Cadillac and Peerless introduced the world's first 90 degree crankshafts, which were marketed as being far superior in smoothness and harshness, to the single-plane crankshafts. The 2 companies shared the design patent.

It's funny how everyone is making a big deal about flat plane cranks these days.
 

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If anybody has ever seen one of those 346 cui Cadillac engines with the oil pan removed you will be surprised to see the size of the counter weights that are bolted to the crankshaft.
Those engines also had forged big end bolts (odd shaped) and hollow rods to allow oil to the wrist pins.
They also ran hydraulic lifters from about 1936.
 
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