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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've been trying to locate the intake port size for 333882 sbc heads.

I know I can take off the manifold and measure them, but won't be able to work on the car till this weekend, and I want to order the right intake gaskets so they're here by the weekend.

I can find the volume for these heads, but not the physical port dimensions.

Anyone happen to know what size the intake ports are?
Thanks
 

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How do you know some jabroni hasn't "gasket matched" them to an oddball gasket?
Nevermind that gasket matching is pointless for most people, and 882 heads are hot garbage.

What intake are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How do you know some jabroni hasn't "gasket matched" them to an oddball gasket?
Nevermind that gasket matching is pointless for most people, and 882 heads are hot garbage.

What intake are you using?
Its a no name (probably Chinese) aluminum intake. Didn't build this engine, bought the car with it. Have a 4 bolt main in the garage that will eventually be rebuilt and replace it, but that's down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 882 heads are about a 160 to 170cc head port size at the most with 76cc combustion chambers.
Yes I can find the volume online, looking for the physical port dimensions:
example: 1.23" x 1.99" or 1.28" x 2.09"

Looking on Jegs at intake gaskets and there's a bunch of different port size options.
 

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How do you know some jabroni hasn't "gasket matched" them to an oddball gasket?
Nevermind that gasket matching is pointless for most people, and 882 heads are hot garbage.

What intake are you using?
Agree not a great head to use the 882's also had some cracking issues and some were prone to the studs pulling you should have them Magnafluxed if you are dead set on using them.
 

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The -882 was just a standard head, so just get gaskets for standard heads... likely 1.23" x 1.99"... that aftermarket intake prolly has bigger ports...

As a recall, there were about 3 different variations of -882 heads... maybe thicker castings in early 1970's and a couple thinner variations later...

They flow to about 385 HP stock, so prolly plenty for what you're doing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agree not a great head to use the 882's also had some cracking issues and some were prone to the studs pulling you should have them Magnafluxed if you are dead set on using them.
I'm using them for now, since the car is already running just leaking coolant at the intake gasket. They will be replaced with likely edlebrock aluminum heads and a 4 bolt main block (entire engine swap) probably by this time next year.

If it turns out the leak is from a cracked head, I'll have to re-plan.
But I don't think it is a cracked head, the coolant is obviously coming out at the gasket mating surface. From other clues working on this car I would bet the correct intake gaskets were not used when the aluminum manifold was put on.
 

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Before putting gaskets on, set the aluminum intake on the engine without gaskets and see if it's warped by checking for parallel gaps everywhere between intake and heads...
 

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There are many different thicknesses and ports sizes when buying intake manifold gaskets for a 350 Chevy. Wait until you get the heads off and closely inspect the gaskets that you take off for compression all the way around the ports. Depending on whether the block or heads or intake manifold have been milled in the past, sometimes they aren't parallel with each other and you end up with a part of the port/ports that are not well sealed. Oftentimes, this will create a vacuum leak or a path from the bottom of the port to an intake valve/valves that allows oily vapor from the crankcase to enter one or more of the cylinders when the intake valve opens.

Not only are there different port sizes, but there are different thicknesses of intake gaskets, depending on the fit of the manifold to heads. Here are all the Mr. Gasket sets that are available at AutoZone and probably most other auto parts outlets, listed in size by thickness, width and then height.....

5820... 0.060" X 1.250" X 2.000"
5821... 0.060" X 1.250" X 2.130"
101G... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.100"
102G... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.190"
5822... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.190"
111.... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.310"
5823... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.310"
143.... 0.060" X 1.350" X 2.260"
5812... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.190"
5813... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.131"
113.... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.310"
126.... 0.125" X 1.380" X 2.250"

Toss the rubber end gaskets in the trash or find another use for them around the house, they are worthless for trying to seal up a manifold. Instead, use gasket maker in a tube, such as #81280 Permatex Ultra-Black. Completely and ABSOLUTELY clean any and all oil or other contaminants from the manifold mating faces and China Walls of the block. (China Walls are the front and rear rails at the top of the block, in between the left and right banks of cylinders. I believe they were named that because they look like the Great Wall of China from an aerial view). I'm going to say this several times........PAY ATTENTION........

THE BOTTOMS OF THE MANIFOLD AND THE ADJOINING SURFACES OF THE HEADS WHERE THE GASKETS STOP AND THE TOPS (and down about a quarter inch) OF THE CHINA WALLS ON THE BLOCK MUST BE CLEAN AND DRY SO THAT THE PERMATEX WILL STICK AND DRY HARD, CREATING AN ABSOLUTE SEAL AGAINST OIL MIGRATION FROM THE INTERIOR OF THE MOTOR. USE ACETONE OR OTHER CHEMICAL TO REMOVE ALL OIL FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE MANIFOLD AND THE TOPS OF THE CHINA WALLS AND DOWN ABOUT A QUARTER INCH FROM THE TOP OF THE WALLS.

These must be clean and dry, so that the Ultra-Black sealant will stick and set up hard. Spread it along on the front and rear China Walls of the block and up onto the heads a little to make a seal with the gasket ends. (In my experience, do not let the silicone dry at all before you drop the manifold into place, drop the manifold down into place as soon as you get the silicone spread). Put a bolt into each corner of the manifold and ease them down with your FINGERS ONLY. Do not tighten any one bolt down completely at one time.

For instance, turn the passenger side front down a couple of turns with your fingers, then turn the driver side rear down a couple of turns with your fingers, then the passenger side rear down a couple of turns, then the driver side front down a couple of turns until you have all four down snug. Walk away and leave the whole mess alone for 24 hours, then tighten all bolts down to torque spec in sequence.

When you ease the manifold down, the silicone will squeeze out of the gaps at the front and rear. Leave it alone and let it set up hard for 24 hours, then trim the excess off with a razor knife. When laying the silicone along the China Walls, make sure you have applied enough so that it will squeeze out a little from the joint so that you can trim it off after the silicone has set up hard. Don't worry about the little bit of silicone that ends up getting squished toward the inside of the block. It will dry and just hang there until the next time somebody pulls the intake manifold.

To measure the gaskets that you remove from the motor, you will need a caliper, either a dial caliper or a digital caliper. These are not expensive and can be sourced at your nearest Harbor Freight tool store. In my experience, a dial caliper is the way to go. I have owned digital calipers as well, but every time I went to use them, the batteries were dead. A dial caliper, on the other hand, is bulletproof and works every time you reach for it. If you can find a 12" for reasonable money, you can even measure block deck height with it.
https://www.harborfreight.com/catal...,f&q=calipers+&+dial+indicators+&+micrometers

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There are many different thicknesses and ports sizes when buying intake manifold gaskets for a 350 Chevy. Wait until you get the heads off and closely inspect the gaskets that you take off for compression all the way around the ports. Depending on whether the block or heads or intake manifold have been milled in the past, sometimes they aren't parallel with each other and you end up with a part of the port/ports that are not well sealed. Oftentimes, this will create a vacuum leak or a path from the bottom of the port to an intake valve/valves that allows oily vapor from the crankcase to enter one or more of the cylinders when the intake valve opens.

Not only are there different port sizes, but there are different thicknesses of intake gaskets, depending on the fit of the manifold to heads. Here are all the Mr. Gasket sets that are available at AutoZone and probably most other auto parts outlets, listed in size by thickness, width and then height.....

5820... 0.060" X 1.250" X 2.000"
5821... 0.060" X 1.250" X 2.130"
101G... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.100"
102G... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.190"
5822... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.190"
111.... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.310"
5823... 0.060" X 1.310" X 2.310"
143.... 0.060" X 1.350" X 2.260"
5812... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.190"
5813... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.131"
113.... 0.125" X 1.310" X 2.310"
126.... 0.125" X 1.380" X 2.250"

Toss the rubber end gaskets in the trash or find another use for them around the house, they are worthless for trying to seal up a manifold. Instead, use gasket maker in a tube, such as #81280 Permatex Ultra-Black. Completely and ABSOLUTELY clean any and all oil or other contaminants from the manifold mating faces and China Walls of the block. (China Walls are the front and rear rails at the top of the block, in between the left and right banks of cylinders. I believe they were named that because they look like the Great Wall of China from an aerial view). I'm going to say this several times........PAY ATTENTION........

THE BOTTOMS OF THE MANIFOLD AND THE ADJOINING SURFACES OF THE HEADS WHERE THE GASKETS STOP AND THE TOPS (and down about a quarter inch) OF THE CHINA WALLS ON THE BLOCK MUST BE CLEAN AND DRY SO THAT THE PERMATEX WILL STICK AND DRY HARD, CREATING AN ABSOLUTE SEAL AGAINST OIL MIGRATION FROM THE INTERIOR OF THE MOTOR. USE ACETONE OR OTHER CHEMICAL TO REMOVE ALL OIL FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE MANIFOLD AND THE TOPS OF THE CHINA WALLS AND DOWN ABOUT A QUARTER INCH FROM THE TOP OF THE WALLS.

These must be clean and dry, so that the Ultra-Black sealant will stick and set up hard. Spread it along on the front and rear China Walls of the block and up onto the heads a little to make a seal with the gasket ends. (In my experience, do not let the silicone dry at all before you drop the manifold into place, drop the manifold down into place as soon as you get the silicone spread). Put a bolt into each corner of the manifold and ease them down with your FINGERS ONLY. Do not tighten any one bolt down completely at one time.

For instance, turn the passenger side front down a couple of turns with your fingers, then turn the driver side rear down a couple of turns with your fingers, then the passenger side rear down a couple of turns, then the driver side front down a couple of turns until you have all four down snug. Walk away and leave the whole mess alone for 24 hours, then tighten all bolts down to torque spec in sequence.

When you ease the manifold down, the silicone will squeeze out of the gaps at the front and rear. Leave it alone and let it set up hard for 24 hours, then trim the excess off with a razor knife. When laying the silicone along the China Walls, make sure you have applied enough so that it will squeeze out a little from the joint so that you can trim it off after the silicone has set up hard. Don't worry about the little bit of silicone that ends up getting squished toward the inside of the block. It will dry and just hang there until the next time somebody pulls the intake manifold.

To measure the gaskets that you remove from the motor, you will need a caliper, either a dial caliper or a digital caliper. These are not expensive and can be sourced at your nearest Harbor Freight tool store. In my experience, a dial caliper is the way to go. I have owned digital calipers as well, but every time I went to use them, the batteries were dead. A dial caliper, on the other hand, is bulletproof and works every time you reach for it. If you can find a 12" for reasonable money, you can even measure block deck height with it.
https://www.harborfreight.com/catal...,f&q=calipers+&+dial+indicators+&+micrometers

.

Thanks for the time and effort to write this all up.
I've had trouble buying parts for generic small block chevy at autozone. The kiddos that work there seem completely stumped if you cannot give them a year/make and model of car that they can look up the part in their computer with. And the parts I'm looking for will not be found trying to look up a 1929 model A ford.

Years ago, the parts places I'd go to would let you go behind the counter and try match parts up yourself in the rare instance they couldn't do it themselves.

I ordered the 1.23 x 1.99 and a set of 1.28 x 2.09, from what I've been reading they seem to be the most likely candidates for these heads. If they're wrong I'll take the old ones into autozone and hope for the best. I do have calipers so I can get accurate measurements.

The radiator I replaced had evidences of hitting the fan at some point in this car's life, so its possible the engine has been overheated at some point in its lifetime. The possibility of dealing with a warped intake manifold is not out of the question, so I'll have to check it out, or have it checked out before putting it back on.

Thanks again for all the input.
 

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The gasket is 1.25 x about 2.25 or a little less (it's bent so hard to get the long dimension). It's pretty tight to the wider parts of the port.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 
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