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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone point me to any online resources which discuss the legalities in using, moving or fabricating fuel tanks? I need to know what kind of regulations come into play when constructing a fuel tank for a street-driven vehicle, and whether there are any regs regarding accepted materials used and/or tank location on the vehicle. I spent over an hour trying to Google this, but pretty much came up empty-handed.

Thanks!
 

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Home Built Rods No Rules
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The nsra safety inspections state: check valve on trunk and interior mounted tanks: no clear,plastic lines allows. Also I think the draw line to the tank should be to the top of the tank. Made mine out of stainless in the trunk of my coupe: draw line to top,roll over check valve vent out the bottom: passed nsra safety check hope this helps :)
 

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Kenneth Howard hates me...
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According to the Bosch Automotive Handbook (2nd edition):

"Fuel tanks must be corrosion-resistant and must be able to withstand a pressure which is twice the operating pressure. Any over-pressure which occurs must automatically escape through suitable openings, safety valve or the like. Fuel must not escape past the filler cap or through the pressure-equalization device even with the vehicle at a tilt, during cornering or in the event of impact."



C
 

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The question that just occurred to me as I reread this thread is what are you wishing to do with a fuel tank? What custom touch are you wanting to do? There are lots of tanks out there that might already suit your needs. Or even places that do custom tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all who have responded so far. :D

I manage a website for '67-'72 Ford pickups. Most of the trucks of this era had an in-cab fuel tank, and many of the e-mails and forum posts I get are from people wanting to remove the in-cab tank and want to know alternatives for tank replacement. I've known some who just put the removed tank into the back of the bed and others who are able to find factory auxiliary tank setups. But some people don't have access to factory auxiliary tanks and are looking for alternatives. One forum user was asking about converting a 16-gallon beer keg into a fuel tank.

So anyway, for the purpose of writing up a complete and informative tutorial on the subject of fuel tanks, I wanted to get some input on what was and wasn't legal. What's been provided here so far has been helpful, but I'm always open for more hints and suggestions.

Thanks!
 

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It probably varies from state to state. In Arkansas it is probably not as regulated as in California. Up here as long as it is secured good and does not look like a fire hazzard I could probably care less.
 

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I have a '59 chevy pickup. The orig tank behind the seat went bad years ago. I had a custom tank made where the spare normally goes. As far as legal issues, California does not have any safety inspection program, so I never had issues with it.

When I redo the tank, I will make it smaller with a bottom sump. That custom 25 gallon tank is just too big (& it partially blocks the view of my Dana 60;) )
 

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Made my own 22 gal. tank out of 14 ga. sheet steel for my 53 Chevy pickup. It has a center baffle to keep the fuel from sloshing too much around corners, a bottom sump, and uses a pro-street type filler with integral pressure relief valve. All seams are fully welded and the tank is completely coated on the inside with fuel tank sealer. Meets all NSRA safety requirements and sure beats the old in cab tank that came in these old Chevy AD trucks.

Centerline
 

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Start those projects someday
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RV's usually have very large tanks (over 60 gallons). They are most always built out of sheet steel. Some models with dual tanks have the main tank made from stamped steel and are galvanized. The auxiliary tanks are mostly custom made to fit a certain area behind the axle and are plain sheet steel. I've seen lots of tanks like that in RV"'s but I don't know about the legal issue in cars. I have a square aluminum tank in my Commando.
 

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scavenge!

Not for sure on the '67-later trucks' frame dimensions, but the older (ie:53-56 (check out John Niolon's tank swap in his '53 F-100 http://www.clubfte.com/users/jniolon/mustangtank/newmustangtank.htm )) can accomodate older mustang, isuzu trooper, dodge raider tanks with very slight modifications. Pretty much check for clearances, hang it secure with some strap, and hook up your filler tube. Of course there's other details but here are some possible donors...
 
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