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Ok .. this guy i now told me to have a good paint job (among other things) you have to let the car sit after you do all of the body work ie . filling dips and holes . I realy only know just the basics about a paint job, but wonder if this being true about letting the car sit in this stage , what is this stage that i let the car sit and let the body work breath(let the chemicals come threw and off the car) so as to not have them bubbling up the paint when its applied? I need to know this so as to tell the body shop how i want it done.

Thanks bill
 

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if you are having a body shop do all the work then i would just let them do it there own way.You will find everyone has a way of doing things which are for the most part correct. If it is a reputable company that has been in business for some time then they should know what to do. I would just take them the car and say here, call me when its done
 

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Be the MIRACLE!
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Letting the vehicle sit allows time for the solvents to dissapate from the vehicle. If you apply the paint too soon after bodywork/filler and the solvent is still there and it will bubble up your good paint job. I know, I did a motorcylce once and right in the middle of my artwork a big bubble sprang up. Fortunately the bike was mine.
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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I have to say, there is no reason to "let it set" anymore than a day or something if you apply all the products properly. The reason why people have a problem with solvents staying in the products is beause of poor application. It was applied too wet, it had to slow a reducer, it didn't get the proper flash time in between coats, the gun wasn't set up properly, etc.

38, there is nothing in "letting it sit" that could cause a "bubble" that your application of the products wouldn't have cured. A "bubble" is going to be caused by a number of different things, but letting solvents flash off would have little to do it. Your problem was caused by some poor feathering, or an air pocket or something goofy like that, it had nothing to do with solvents other than the solvents reacted to whatever it was. That doesn't mean the solvents are the cause, they simple were the reason it came to life.

Sanding the primer and letting it breath a while sure isn't going to hurt a thing, by all means do it. But honestly, if the product isn't applied in some why that fills it with too much solvents, it really shouldn't be needed. It will no cause any "bubbles" it will at the very most cause some shrinkage and show some sand scratches or gloss die back.

Of course super abuse with solvents will cause more than that, I am talking just common solvent abuse.
 
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