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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was watching Jay Leno's garage on YouTube. One of his guest's car was a well patinaed old VW Beetle. He didn't say much about the finish other than it was Linseed oil. I've never heard of anything like this. What do you think ? Anyone here done this ?
I have a new project that this might work on
 

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1979 Chevrolet Malibu 496-TH400-9" (cruiser). 1992 Chevrolet S10 355-700r4-7.625" (daily driver).
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A few years back I talked to a fellow that used Linseed oil on his T Bucket. He said it was the same idea as putting wax on paint to protect against oxidation. He said he used the Linseed oil to preserve the patina and to give it a clean, shiny look. The way he talked about it gave me the sense that it's a fairly common thing to do. While I'm not really a fan of the patina look, it really did give it a clean and deep shiny appearance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, that's good to know. I have a 67 Baja Bug that l got recently with a Matt Green rattle can paint job. No fancy paint job for that, but Linseed oil sounds perfect.
 

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Matt can you provide a little more input on the service truck and its use's. I see you say it is subjected to salt in winter. Is this truck a plow truck? Also define needle scale it, I am thinking you take a needle gun paint stripper to it.

Asking because I am thinking of this technic for my truck frame, but my truck is not a daily driver or drove much in winter, but I do live on a dirt road, so it would be subjected to rocks, but I am thinking with little use I could get years of life out of it
 
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