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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys I have a question here and need some ideas. First of all I don't have access to a welder so that is out of the question and funds are tight at the moment and I have a Holley 600 vacuum secondary and the base plate is still in excellent condition and the throttle shafts are nice and tight and overall has little wear on it but the problem is the gold side bracket that your throttle cable hooks up to and your return spring hooks up to is loose and I don't know how to fix that without having to buy a new throttle shaft and install a new one in which is not a problem as I have done many of those before.

Is there a way to fix this without welding it like some folks do? I have heard that some people try to peen it again but I hate to say I am green in that area when it comes to doing things like that and don't want to damage things further. I tried to bend it a hair as it was slightly bent but it was still loose. It does not wobble real bad but enough it can eventually wear out the shaft bore with it being floppy like that and I feel create a out of round bore even further in the throttle shaft over time.

Is there a easy way without welding to fix this? Any suggestions would be appreciated. I know they stake it at the factory on the side and peen it over to press on it. From what I can tell it makes contact but would not know how to do this without making it worse. Thanks guys to any who may help
 

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Put the passenger side of the shaft against an improvised anvil so its well supported ,then use a center punch to " spread" the drivers aside into the slot in the linkage arm , just be as gentle as you can . silver solder is probably your beast bet for joining the metal because of it's low melting point & high strength . I'd try the punch first ....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just tried the punch method and it helped some and its tight a lot more then it was but don't know how long it will last. How would I go about drilling it and then tapping it for a 6 /32 screw and washer? I have a drill press and I would take the base plate off and clamp it to press and then proceed to drill the hole but would a regular drill bit be enough to drill through the steel shaft? Also would I have to grind it down to a round circle radius to get the side piece off before I go drilling and then tapping?

Sorry for the dumb questions but that sounds like the best method for further time if it comes up. Thanks guys for the information and much appreciated and that fix would be nice to learn.
 

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OK , upon further thought , if the linkage is worn radially , I.e. the slot in the arm and/ or the flats on the shaft are worn , then IMO , putting a screw in it is of no value . However , if the peened over shaft is allowing the linkage to flop vertically ,or opposite the way the shaft turns , then putting in the screw , with some sort of cup washer , might help . Some days communication is difficult !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I will try the loctite part but the drilling sounds better. I will see if I can some how grind the staked part out and use my little grinder and round it out and then drill a hole into the shaft and then use a 6 /32 tap and get a pan screw of that size. I took a center punch and banged around it and it did tighten it back up and not wobble like it was doing but I am sure with time it will end up loose again.

I don't know why they sometimes do that. I have had it happen on some carbs and not others. That is why I like the quick fuel and billet base plates as they have the nut on the side and they never get loose. Thanks guys for the tips. I will see how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The slot part is not warn at all. It just wiggles side to side and does not move forward or back on the shaft itself and stays square still. It just is not tight any more as with a light you can see a hair where they push the end of the shaft over the linkage where it is pushed up against it. But mine you can see from after years of use it somehow end up loose and wobbles side to side but does not go forward or reverse so the slot area is not worn.
 

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All most any engine shop, repair shop, starter, alternator rebuilding shop or garage has a wire welder. A couple bucks and surely you should find someone local to tac weld it. Ya gotta have a buddy with a welder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I live in a small town full or restaurants and a few auto part stores and one Super center Walmart and that is about it. I have to drive out of town just to get any of the big things needed to come up when needed. Anyways that brazing thing looks good as I just looked up a video on how to do that and I have a big size propane torch but how would I do it without damaging the carb?

Do I have to take the shaft out of the base plate so the excess heat does not travel to the aluminum base plate and damage it? I watched the video and it showed where the guy made the metal burn completely red hot before he added the glaze on it. That seems like a winner there and something new I could learn to do and use for any future fixes on this exact thing. That would be a heck of a lot easier then trying to drill a hole etc. Depending on cost I can get a new shaft for about $25 bucks but it would take me the whole time of grinding the plate screws down and then taking the shaft out and putting it all back together again and re stake the screws.

Just figured on doing something simple to fix it as the plates and throttle shaft are in great condition and would hate to take it apart just for that little issue if there is an easier way. The brazing sounds like a winner to me. So what is it I have to get? Some sort of brazing wire and do regular hardware stores sell that type of stuff? Sorry if sound stuff as I have not done any brazing of any king and it was done with a torch way back in 1992 in shop class and have not did it since then so kind of really foggy there. I just watched some more videos and saw that you have to make the metal red hot and continue very slowly to braze and you have to buy rods which I learned from the video and I would think that would ruin the shaft as making it so hot like that on the linkage part for so long would damage the plastic part where the throttle shaft spring sits on and would warp it or melt it at the most. I think I will just leave it for now and just get a new shaft and be done with it.

A small welder is now on my list for future buying along with a few other tools to be able to be self sufficient to do small things like this. Thanks guys for all your information and help and appreciate all your stuff so much and have no inspired me to learn to look into learning to braze with a propane torch.
 

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Or Silver solder or even a coat hanger.

You want enough heat to do the job BUT not so much to eat up the bushing. Take it out is your best bet. IF you want to try it installed, heat it quick and try too keep the heat out of the shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks johnsongrass. I will give that a try and see how it goes and hopefully it will make it work. That would be a easy way to go. Thanks for the link. I have an appointment where one is located just right across the street for my physical therapy this week. Thanks again everyone.
 

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If you have an OLD dentist in town. He may know how to silver solder , also a jeweler & an HVAC tech should know as well , they would have the necessary stuff to do your task . There are a lot of skills/ procedures that are used in pursuits other than automotive that folks don't think about , if you're in an agricultural area , a farmer or ag repairman may be able to help . Many folks enjoy the challenge of working outside their usual pursuit ...
 

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Be careful with any prolonged un shunted heat. The throttle shafts (many of them) have Teflon sleeves around them to seal and provide some longevity. Melting them would require removal. That’s why I strongly suggest the “quick tac weld”. Since it does not require a heated up bracket nor rod....Good luck in your adventure
 

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I'm with Johnsongrass1.
Grind off peen, remove lever, shorten shaft just a hair more, say .010", ...then drill end of shaft for a pan head or allen head 6-32 screw with a star lock washer.
Shaft just has to be a hair shorter than the surface of the lever wwhen assembled, so the screw will lock the lever on the shaft.

Just like what is already on the opposite end of the shaft, holding all the choke linkage on the shaft. Just like the screw holding the vacuum secondary pod side shaft lnkage on the shaft.
Simple deal in a drill press, pad the blades with wood or plastic shims so they can't move with the baseplate clamped to an 90¯ Angle Plate or in a vise and drill the end of the shaft with the baseplate all together. Shaft is not hard, decent material but not hardened. Sharp drill, sharp tap, easy-peasy.

To do it all with the baseplate together and welding or brazing/soldering, only a Mig or preferably TIG welder is fast enough to not put too much heat into things due to time of arc.
Brazing and soldering are too slow a heat process to do assembled, too much heat will migrate while you're trying to get the end of the shaft up to temp.
 
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