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My bad. I was guilty of not closely reading your entire description. Forgive me for muddying up the waters.
I hate it when people answer a question without really reading and understanding the problem and just did it myself.

John
My bad. I was guilty of not closely reading your entire description. Forgive me for muddying up the waters.
I hate it when people answer a question without really reading and understanding the problem and just did it myself.

John
Its not like we all haven't done the same thing on occasion..............but meaning well is the important thing. :)
 

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1972 Chevy Nova, 650hp LT4, Heidts full frame with IFS and IRS.
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
My bad. I was guilty of not closely reading your entire description. Forgive me for muddying up the waters.
I hate it when people answer a question without really reading and understanding the problem and just did it myself.

John
To be honest I didn't even catch on. I appreciate you taking the time to address my issue.
 

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1972 Chevy Nova, 650hp LT4, Heidts full frame with IFS and IRS.
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I wanted to give an update on the status of my car. I finally got around to putting it all back together with a new fuel sending unit and filter, new return line and a new fuel tank vent. When I turned on the ignition, the fuel pump primed, I attempted to start it, but no luck. It cranked for about 6 seconds before automatically stopping (built in mechanism???). I turned off the ignition, waited a minute and tried again with no luck. I checked and double checked all fuel lines, made sure everything was connected and gave it another try to start it, no go. In thinking I had a vapor lock going on (trapped air in the fuel line), I removed the input side fuel line to the fuel pressure regulator, stuck it into an empty water bottle and turned on the ignition to see if fuel was being sucked from the tank. I got maybe an ounce of fuel. I then emptied the bottle, put the fuel line back in and then turned the ignition on a 2nd time. This time, I got about 1/4th of a bottle of fuel. I connected the fuel line back to the regulator and attempted to start the car and low and behold, it started!!!

No burning wires, no fuel leaks and it ran like it should for a few minutes before I turned it off.

I have a great feeling of accomplishment...LOL.

Thanks again for everyone's input on my issue.

Jim
 

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Fuses are to protect the wire not the device the wire is connected to. Painless did it right. Do you want to burn up a wire in a wiring harness? No! If you want to blow a fuse for the device then put in a smaller fuse but never use a larger fuse that the wire capacity. There is a recent thread about burning up the wire to the fuel pump because the fuse was sized for the pump amp draw and not the wire size. Burnt up all the other wire's insulation in the harness, big mess and dangerous.

Side note - My Dad used to put pennies behind the fuses in the fuse panel for the house. This is back when houses had fuse panels with screw in fuses and not circuit breakers . He only did it in the circuit feeding his power tools in the basement and took them out after he was finished running the tools. I watched him as he flicked the pennies out with his finger while the panel was live. Talk about old school!
 
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