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Discussion Starter #1
When I install new exhaust on my ‘75 truck I want to add a balance pipe. However, having the two exhaust pipes tied together will make it much harder to remove one pipe, or drop it down to get clearance for work on the transmission or transfer case. I plan to continue using exhaust manifolds, so I won’t be able to disconnect at a header collector. Emissions does not require catalytic converters for my truck.

if I want to add band clamp or a flange pipe connection that would make it easier to get the exhaust apart, where should I use them? Would I make the middle of the balance pipe removable ( one or two clamps), or make the entire H pipe removable ( four clamps)? Are band clamps a better choice than bolt-together flanges?

Any suggestions or recommendations for a design?

Thanks,

Bruce
 

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True Hotrodder
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Either style is probably more about personal preference. I like the flange connections myself and I would just do the balance pipe itself with the one flange if that takes care of letting you move the pipes.
 

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I've used the straight band clamps at pipe butt joints. I love them. They come apart easily, even after years in a daily driver. If your pipe joint is an overlap (like pipe into muffler), use the stepped band clamps. I've been able to remove them after years also, but sliding the pipes apart can take a little persuasion.
 

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I love band clamps. They seal great, come apart easily, one bolt instead of three makes for faster removal, and will not bend or dig into things like you can with flanges.

Have band clamps at the back of your headers and at the front of your mufflers with 4 rubber hangers at the front and rear of your mufflers.

You can unclamp at the mufflers and unclamp at the headers to easily slide the H back for engine removal. If you want to drop the H then that just requires dropping the cross member supporting the back of the transmission in some way. This allows the H to stay in one piece and a majority of the exhaust tucked tight up inside the frame where it will not be damaged if you get high centered.
 

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If you want the balance pipe to drop out, without disconnecting a manifold pipe, then you will have to use flanges.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the input.

A single flange or clamp on the H would be the simplest, but I expect problems with getting it to line up when reinstalling. Making the entire H removable may be the best solution since I can then maneuver each tailpipe to get it aligned. My tailpipes are long, and with oval mufflers and the exit running out to the side, the offset weight makes them want to rotate when disconnected.

Bruce
 

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stainless band clamps on the sides. Put a bolted flange with a copper gasket in the middle if you dont want a 3rd band clamp.
 

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If you run rubber before and after the muffler they will rotate much less when the center section is removed.

A strap also works to restrict the rotation for those with a fully finished setup.
 

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I’m assuming you want the sound of a balance pipe. As for performance I doubt you will see any difference. If you want a performance enhancement headers would do that. But it would be some what louder.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Nomad - As part of my exhaust replacement I want to go with lower restriction mufflers, probably a Magnaflow oval with the straight through perforated tube down the center. However, I expect this muffler may be a little louder than what I have now and I hope a balance pipe will reduce the sound level a little, and also give it a lower exhaust tone.

Actually, I can live with a little more noise, as long as my 350 V8 does not sound like a six cylinder with a cheap, loud muffler.:)

Bruce
 

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If you like the ‘60’s muscle car/corvette sound a reverse flow low restriction with normal dual pipes sounds nice and not too loud. I have reverse flow off road mufflers on my Corvette with less baffles that sounds great to me. Straight thru is gonna sound a lot like the old chambered system in Camaro’s and Chevelle’s and is quite loud with higher compression engines. The bigger the diameter also promotes more loud.
Not everybody has the same measure of loud so difficult to converse In text what is good for you.
 

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If your after a sound then it is best to copy a similar setup. This is a in person thing videos often do not do justice.
I would point you at a super chevy car show or something locally where alot of similar engines with similar headers are set up.
The muffler(and cat) is going to make the largest diffrence in sound. All a H pipe is going to do is even the pulse lessening the "thud" out the rear.
 

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Nomad - As part of my exhaust replacement I want to go with lower restriction mufflers, probably a Magnaflow oval with the straight through perforated tube down the center. However, I expect this muffler may be a little louder than what I have now and I hope a balance pipe will reduce the sound level a little, and also give it a lower exhaust tone.

Actually, I can live with a little more noise, as long as my 350 V8 does not sound like a six cylinder with a cheap, loud muffler.:)

Bruce
HEY HEY HEY.....

i happen to like the farm tractor-sound. There, i said it.

Anyways, is it better to put a crossover pipe as soon as possible after the headers/manifolds or does it not matter if the goal is to quiet things down? You can probably see where i'm going with this....?
 
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