Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Just a firefighter
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, I have to make a rear rollpan for my '46 Chevy panel truck because nobody in the entire country makes one. I found a sheetmetal guy here that can make the top to bottom bend for me then I'm going to have to go to the hammers, dollies and some cuts for the curve at the ends. It's not that drastic of a curve so it should be pretty easy. I'll just weld it and the cuts in then grind and fill as needed. Now I was thinking of using 18 ga cold rolled metal for this but he told me to use 20 ga. galvinized to make it easier on me with the hammer work. To paint it I just need to sand it rough and clean with viniger and the paint will stick.
Now I'm no metal worker and I'm not sure if the 20 ga. is strong enough or if I should use the cold rolled or galvinized. I will be mounting my tail lights and a lic. plate bucket in the pan also.
Let me know what you folks think about this.

Thanks a bunch. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Sounds good- although I don't use galvanized anything- just my preference- I like 18ga. but 20 is easier to work with and will be plenty strong for your application. Just take it slow and have fun!!! :)
 

·
Just one of the guys
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
Don't use galvanized. The fumes that come off of it are hazardous if you do welding to it. Plus you need to pickle it to get anything to stick. Use cold rolled steel, the same thing the truck is made out of now. Degrease, weld, sand, prime, paint. 20 gage is usually the norm for replacement panels and if it is something that is just a straight piece then 18 gage would work. For what you are doing though the 20 will work just fine.

Kevin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Just a thought. I'm an 'old school' hot rodder. It simply means I'm cheap to a point, I like/prefer to build . Necessity caused this, when I started you couldn't buy anything but speed equipment. I have built several roll pans and even rocker panel, you need a good eye, some imagination, and a little luck. If you look at the top edge of a pickup truck bed the top bed side panel rolls over, I know some have holes for standards but these are hidden when you cut the shape you need and flip the panel, fill them or leave them, you may discover with a long bed side panel you can cut a shape w/o any holes. Different years and mfgs have different shapes. Try visiting local dealerships body shop scrap pile. If a wrecked bedside has been discarded the shop service mgr. or shop foreman will probably give it to you, may even cut out the metal you need for free or??? Don't let the newer thin sheet metal fool you, when you mig weld it will stiffen back up...'spot' weld on low using the soft body shop wire. Keep it cool and work slow. If the panel is weak after you finish tacking in place, design brace panels for the hidden under/back side from the left over scrap. Hope this gives you some ideas.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top