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I have a '49 Chevy truck. The Hood is in pretty bad shape and I cant seem to find a good one new or used. Its strange everyone makes just about every body part for it except the hood <img src="graemlins/pain.gif" border="0" alt="[pain]" /> I have seen a couple articles lately on molding foam and layering fiber glass on it to make a part. I wonder if there could be a way I could use my old hood to make a mold to make a fiber glass hood. I know I could buy one that lifts off from autobodysource but whats the fun in that? :rolleyes: I would like to do it and be able to incorporate the original bracing so I can use the hood hinges. Am I crazy or can this be done?? Any one have experience?? Tricks?? Tips??
 

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It can be done and is fairly straight forward for a person with reasonable mechanical aptitude. Doesn't require any specialized tools. I made the hood on the '36 Willys in my post picture (see left) from a fiberglass mold I made of the original steel hood. Contact FiberLay (www.fiberlay.com) for all the materials. They also sell a book "Fiberglass & Composite Materials" by Forbes Aird (how's that for a name?!) That has a fairly good discussion of making molds and parts. there are a lot of suppliers out there but they specialize in mail order and a complete list of materials and are very helpful with tech advice to the novice.

I'm guessing for a part that size you will spend about $500 - $600 for materials for the mold and a part.
 

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Thanks that was a good site. Guess Ill order that ook and video. I do better with videos. HA. That one you did looks great! At least I know it can be done.

Can you fiber glass in metal parts such as were you mount the hinge brackets and hood latches. I assume you must have done something to have it tilt.

Thanks again!
 

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Absolutely. Just clean them to bare metal where they contact the 'glass, drill a few holse for the resin to anchor through and anchor them in place with a couple layers of mat and resin. I often "glue" the metal parts in place with some bondo before glassing them in permanently.

I have a '53 Chevy pickup and the hinge bracket that spans the rear edge of the hood looks like it was made to glass into a plastic hood. Ditto for the latch bracket in front, although you could make a much lighter and smaller one than the GM version and us the ubiquitous VW hood latch.

I think they only list one video in their catalog and it covers making cast resin parts, not fiberglass laminate construction. I don't think you will be happy with it for the purpose of making your hood.

[ September 06, 2002: Message edited by: [email protected] ]</p>
 

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there is a simpler way to make the brackets fit, after you construct your mold and and you are done with the layup, just lay the reinforcements (sandblasted and "paintet" with wet resin) from the old hood wet with resin in the wet resin of the layup and do a couple of layers of low weight rowing on top of it , this will give you the regidity you need for a hood that doesnt flimpse arround when open, AND all the hinges and brackets will be in the correct location

remember to save the mold so you can make a buck dooing more hoods once the word gets arround that "this guy can make a new hood from the old rusted junk".. :)
 

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Maverick,
I don't know where you are but I have an extra hood here in central PA you might be interested in if you're building a daily driver and interested in keeping costs down. You also might consider going to Carlisle and/or Hershey in October. Someone there would likely have a used hood as well.
Soilprof
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Iam a LOOOOOONNG ways from the North East. Little Rock,Arkansas to be exact. But, Thanks any way.

Dan
 

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I am an "advanced composite technician" on helicopters. willys36 is correct, but when you go and do your lay-ups, go with weave direction in 45 degree angles to each other. This will add tremendous strength.

Also, if you do not get all of the air pockets or small bubbles out from between each layer, as the engine heats up or the sun heats it up, the bubbles will expand and cause what is known as delamination, not good or fun to repair...

That lay-up is known as a quasi-isotropic lay-up, that is not a joke, it is real.

If you need any assistance, shoot me an e-mail, and I can walk you through it. I went to the Air Force Advanced Composite school. Good Luck
 

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I guess I should start a new thread, but my question is on the same topic so I'll take a chance here...

I have been thinking of trying some 'glass work for a custom console and I got some advice from a guy but he didn't really know that much about this kind of work from the sound of it. He works with 'glass, but with a chopper gun spraying moulds.

someone had told me that you can use the foam they use for flower arrangements (dark green and easily shaped, not sure what it's real name is though) to carve a mould and then just lay the 'glass sheet and/or mat in that mold (and resin, etc). has anyone tried using that stuff for a mould? any suggestions for something else that is readily available and not too expensive?

I have also seen examples where the person made a wood frame, covered that with a tightly-pulled t-shirt and laid the 'glass over that. How well does that work? It looked incredible, but how long would something like that hold up?

any help is really appreciated before i go and blow all this money to find out I've been BS'ed or I misunderstood something.
 

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Mist check this <a href="http://www.termpro.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=32&t=000571" target="_blank">out.</a> Thats probably the example you've seen. This way works just fine and if you make a thick enough layering of 'glass cloth it will probably last longer than you will. You could also make a male mold from styrafoam and coat it with several layers of ordinary house primer and layer the cloth on that and after its hardened scoup out the styrafoam from the bottom and discard. Depending on how skilled you are I usually make mine from sheetmetal, steel or aluminum, but its much harder and time consuming. Although if you need more insite on any of this let me know through e-maill or PM, be glad to help.

HK
 

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yup, that's the one I had seen, but I lost then link. Thanks a lot. I have never done anything like this so i won't be trying to do it with sheetmetal yet. I'm thinking about trying to take night classes at the local VoTech for Auto Body so maybe after that I can take that kind of step. For now I'll stick to the 'foam I think. Is it the flower arrangement stuff or is it a different kind of 'foam?
 

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you could use the flower arrangment stuff with lots of house primer or styrafoam like you have in couch cushions and lots of primer. the couch cushion type foam can be easily rounded with a lighter and a spray bottle of water. The fumes are very bad so do it outside if you go that route.

HK
 

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All of these ideas do work, BUT remember to use some sort of release film.

It can be release film (non-porous), porous film, or a water based release agent.

I built a fin, on my Dad's friends top fuel Harley drag bike, it was out of carbon fiber, it took several tries to get the mold correct for it to go on the main fairing. I tried the flower arrangement green foam, it didn't work for me since I used a hot bonder (auto ramp heat/cool stages + 22 - 25 lbs. vacuum), crushed like nothing. It will work otherwise. Make sure your equipment is dust free and your mold is clean and dust free.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #14
For those who are interested Street Rodder Magazine is doing a run on making fiber glass parts. Last month was part one the intro. this month part two is the tools of the trade. Just thought I would pass it along!


<img src="graemlins/mwink.gif" border="0" alt="[mwink]" />
 

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don't know if you're still looking or not, but i read in a magazine once that the hoods off of a school bus of the same year would fit. just an idea.
 

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The Chevy truck you have is the most common old truck in the world. Starting in mid-production 1947 and continued with few changes through 1953, in 54 went to different grille and one-piece windshield, in 55 went to open drive and 12volt system (in mid-production 1955, the "new"style truck was introduced).
Regarding the hood, any 1947-53 and maybe the 54-early 55 Chevrolet pickup, school bus, rescue squad truck, bread truck, that has that nose has a hood you can use. These trucks, buses, etc. are as common as dirt everywhere in the South.
You won't have any trouble here.
 

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Fiberglass body for Willys Truck

Hello, all I am new on here I have been reading through the threads. And I have a question does anyone know of anybody that makes fiberglass bodies for Willys trucks??? I have searched and searched for this and have come up with nothing. Any help would be greatly appreciated e-mail if you like at [email protected] Thanks.
 

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funny questions about fiberglass

41willys said:
I am an "advanced composite technician" on helicopters. willys36 is correct, but when you go and do your lay-ups, go with weave direction in 45 degree angles to each other. This will add tremendous strength.

Also, if you do not get all of the air pockets or small bubbles out from between each layer, as the engine heats up or the sun heats it up, the bubbles will expand and cause what is known as delamination, not good or fun to repair...

That lay-up is known as a quasi-isotropic lay-up, that is not a joke, it is real.

If you need any assistance, shoot me an e-mail, and I can walk you through it. I went to the Air Force Advanced Composite school. Good Luck
I have a question, I have a 1970 F250 that is in pretty good shape but I wanted to make it lighter for the sand dunes and mudbogs. I wanted to know if you can just lay or wrap the part in plastic wrap and apply fiberglass to form the part. I know this will make the part off size to a eight of an inch. But for a mud truck I don't plan on having fun for looks.I would like any feed back. Thank you.. david
 

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On a steel part with cured paint, all you need to do is wax it well with Part-All mold release wax then lay up the 'glas on it. 'Glas part will pop right off and the resin won't harm the paint in the slightest. If you are going to that effort, why not go ahead and lay up a coating of tooling gel and 4 layers of mat on the metal part then use that as a mold to make the final 'glas part with white gel coat, 1 layer of woven cloth and two layers of mat? Then it will be much easier to finish and if you crack up the new part, you can easily make another from the mold.
 
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