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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes another one.. opinions please.
High nickel 010, 4 bolt block, bored 4.030
Scat 9000 cast steel crank
Scat pro series 5.7 rods
Wiseco forged 7.5 D dish pistons
Pistons .005 in the hole
Felpro 1003 head gasket .040 compressed
AFR Enforcer as cast heads 195/64cc
Howards hydraulic roller cam 110255 12s
.510/.530, adv dur 284/288, @ .050 231/235, 112LSA
Cam spec by Howards for my application
1.5 rockers
1 5/8 headers, 2 1/2 exhaust
Static compression 10.64 to 1, DNC at my altitude 8.07, .045 quench
90 octane fuel
This engine is going in a 69 camaro, approx #3500, M21 4 speed, 4.10 rear
Car is street only, driven less than 500 a year
Haven't decided on the intake yet, dual plane Edelbrock air gap or performer RPM
Carb will probably be a holley 750 dbl pumper, I do have 650 dbl pumper that I might try too
Looking for low end power with decent idle and the ability to run on pump gas
 

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That sounds like a really good build and in my opinion I might not be liked for saying this but I have used several 70's 350 blocks over the years which some were the so called famous 010 high nickle blocks and I have used other 4 bolt main blocks and then bought a brand new two piece rear main seal block in the early 2000's and later on my first oem one piece rear main seal GM block which was a four bolt main and several were over 400 plus horse power builds and I can say all the blocks came out well and none ever showed any difference in durability or quality minus the better options of running a factor roller cam in the one piece rear main seal block. The specs on those blocks were all good across the board when I had them done at the machine shop and when measuring things etc there was very minor differences in them.

In some ways the one piece rear main seal blocks are actually better overall for thickness wise on the cylinders as I have read many times the older blocks would not go .060 over hardly at all and on some one piece rear main seal blocks they can have a slight better chance of going at .060 but it is still rare but more often doable versus the older blocks. Just what I have heard but not saying its facts.

I think your build should make around 450 easy with those AFR heads but that is just a throw out there number and that thing should make a tone of torque as well and that is a good weekend warrior type of a build. I had a 350 similar in specs like that with similar cam specs and I can say it was a really nice build and it was in my last truck I sold and it was a very snappy engine and had a lot of power and with yours being a 383 it would have a lot more torque. Good luck on your build.
 

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Really the only major concern is a block core shift where the casting is uneven in the areas of the cylinders. Going to .060” over bore and having sufficient casting wall is about the only issue IMHO. Racing applications this may be more of a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Stop with the internet innuendo about hi-nickel 010 blocks , its BS from what I've been able told ! The vast majority of 350 Chevy blocks from the 70's through the 80's were 010 .IME
I knew when I wrote that someone would take exception to it and that's ok. When I started on this journey a couple of months ago to build a 383 I didn't know much about them nor did I have any experience in buying a donor block for a from scratch build, my criteria was simply find a virgin 4 bolt main block, I knew nothing of the hi-nickel designation. My source of information comes from two different sources, first was from the 1989 Chevy Small-Block V8 Interchange Manual written by David Lewis, in summary he states, metal alloy identification of blocks is designated by numbers cast on the back of the block by a 10, 20, both, or no designation at all, indicating no trace elements of nickel or tin. How many blocks were cast with each I have no idea, maybe alot, it sounds like you have more experience than I. My other source came from the machinist where I took the block to for inspection, when I showed him the block he said, oh that's a good block it's a hi-nickel block and pointed to the 10 casting number. So that's all I know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That sounds like a really good build and in my opinion I might not be liked for saying this but I have used several 70's 350 blocks over the years which some were the so called famous 010 high nickle blocks and I have used other 4 bolt main blocks and then bought a brand new two piece rear main seal block in the early 2000's and later on my first oem one piece rear main seal GM block which was a four bolt main and several were over 400 plus horse power builds and I can say all the blocks came out well and none ever showed any difference in durability or quality minus the better options of running a factor roller cam in the one piece rear main seal block. The specs on those blocks were all good across the board when I had them done at the machine shop and when measuring things etc there was very minor differences in them.

In some ways the one piece rear main seal blocks are actually better overall for thickness wise on the cylinders as I have read many times the older blocks would not go .060 over hardly at all and on some one piece rear main seal blocks they can have a slight better chance of going at .060 but it is still rare but more often doable versus the older blocks. Just what I have heard but not saying its facts.

I think your build should make around 450 easy with those AFR heads but that is just a throw out there number and that thing should make a tone of torque as well and that is a good weekend warrior type of a build. I had a 350 similar in specs like that with similar cam specs and I can say it was a really nice build and it was in my last truck I sold and it was a very snappy engine and had a lot of power and with yours being a 383 it would have a lot more torque. Good luck on your build.
My main concern is if I'm running too much compression for 90 octane, 10.6 is a little higher than I would like and was thinking 10.1 to 1 is where I wanted to be. From what I've been told from the cam tech guy I talked to and other sources I should be ok maybe have to run some octane booster or dial back the timing on a hot day. I'm just at the begining stages of this build so I can still make adjustments, I've only committed to the pistons thus far so to change the compression I'd have to go with a larger cc combustion chamber like a 68 or so, the problem I run into is I'd like to get the AFR Enforcer as cast because of value and price, however I only see them in 64cc for sbc, to get something else and stay with AFR's I have to double the cost and get one of their cnc'd heads at twice the cost. So unless I get an overwellming response to back down I'll probably move forward the direction I'm headed.[/ICODE]
 

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010 is just the last 3 digits of the casting number, has nothing to do with nickel in the cast iron. That said, the 010 block is used for heavy duty applications from factory high performance engines to workaday truck, marine and industrial engines, so it’s a good platform to build on when the budget doesn’t stretch to aftermarket blocks. The 010 block is found in 2 and 4 bolt mains. If the stampings on the block pad just in front of the left cylinder head are sill visable it will tell you, in code, the original configuration of the engine. Generally if going to a medium power car or 1/2 ton pickups it will have 2 bolt mains though often you’re surprised with 4 bolts. Going into high performance cars, 3/4 ton and up trucks, marine and industrial most often these are 4 bolt blocks.

Where 010 and sometimes 020 is present its just an ID of that core piece used as a part to build up the casting core. Every single piece of the block core has a number that identifies it. At this point we’re talking about the individual sand core parts that are manufactured on the core line. These treated sand core parts are then assembled into what essentially is a negative version of the block, head or whatever is being cast. They make up the spaces where the iron won’t be. After solidifying the pour, the rough block is removed from the core box and roughly treated on a tumbler to use good old violent force to bust up the cores which are emptied as more or less loose sand through holes that will become coolant ports and where soft plugs will be installed. If there is a problem with the core making a good cast part these numbers lead back to the core and the tool used to make that core.

GM is quiet on the subject of nickel or tin for that matter in their castings, I rather doubt much if any especillay of expensive nickel shows up in anything short of Bow Tie castings. Tin if used is there to aid the iron’s flow into the casting box, it is problematic to use because at the temperature to liquify iron is far above tin’s melting point so mixed in with iron the tin is constantly boiling away. This makes holding a constant percent in the alloy mixture across the time a pour is being made difficult to maintain.

Bogie
 

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Bogies is like a walking encyclopedia and knows so much stuff its unreal.As far as you running 93 octane and not having any problems with detonation, if you have a tight quench and a good cooling system. I had a recent Dart SHP 377 build that had a smaller camshaft then what you had and I had around 180 to 190 psi cranking pressure and it was ragged edge at close to 10:1 and I was able to throw 89 octane in it and never had any problems with the few times I was able to run it but that is another long story.

I did not have the proper .040 quench that is what is recommended and mine was around .055 or so but it seemed to run good with being careful on the timing. From what I have read 9.5 is the limit for cast iron heads and 10.5 for aluminum heads on pump gas but there other factors factors in place as well. Your camshaft is on the starting point of bigger side of things and it causes lower pressure on the bottom end of things and always needs higher compression to help recover that loss and your compression ratio is right on the edge wise of being quite high for pump fuel but it will work well with your cam.

Many things comes into play such as vehicle weight and other factors such as rear gearing and transmission type and the load on the engine can all make things happen in different ways.

Hopefully your compression won't be too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
010 is just the last 3 digits of the casting number, has nothing to do with nickel in the cast iron. That said, the 010 block is used for heavy duty applications from factory high performance engines to workaday truck, marine and industrial engines, so it’s a good platform to build on when the budget doesn’t stretch to aftermarket blocks. The 010 block is found in 2 and 4 bolt mains. If the stampings on the block pad just in front of the left cylinder head are sill visable it will tell you, in code, the original configuration of the engine. Generally if going to a medium power car or 1/2 ton pickups it will have 2 bolt mains though often you’re surprised with 4 bolts. Going into high performance cars, 3/4 ton and up trucks, marine and industrial most often these are 4 bolt blocks.

Where 010 and sometimes 020 is present its just an ID of that core piece used as a part to build up the casting core. Every single piece of the block core has a number that identifies it. At this point we’re talking about the individual sand core parts that are manufactured on the core line. These treated sand core parts are then assembled into what essentially is a negative version of the block, head or whatever is being cast. They make up the spaces where the iron won’t be. After solidifying the pour, the rough block is removed from the core box and roughly treated on a tumbler to use good old violent force to bust up the cores which are emptied as more or less loose sand through holes that will become coolant ports and where soft plugs will be installed. If there is a problem with the core making a good cast part these numbers lead back to the core and the tool used to make that core.

GM is quiet on the subject of nickel or tin for that matter in their castings, I rather doubt much if any especillay of expensive nickel shows up in anything short of Bow Tie castings. Tin if used is there to aid the iron’s flow into the casting box, it is problematic to use because at the temperature to liquify iron is far above tin’s melting point so mixed in with iron the tin is constantly boiling away. This makes holding a constant percent in the alloy mixture across the time a pour is being made difficult to maintain.

Bogie
Great information I’m learning as I go along. FIW the 010 or 020 designation that I was referring to was not the last three of the casting number (which is by the way) but the solo 010 that is on either side of the block below the cylinder head as well as on both ends of the block. My engine is date cast 1978 it came from a city work truck of what tonnage I’m not sure but large enough to have a dump bed on it. It was used seasonally and had 37k on it. The guy I bought it from got it from a friend who bought the truck at auction for the chassis and gave him the engine. One odd thing is the vin plate on the front of the head is blank, from what I read it could mean a couple of things, one the block has been decked, which I don’t think it has, two it could be a replacement block, or three sometimes they were left blank because at the time they didn’t know what application it was going to be used for.
 

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OK, still do not get it, why build a 383 and use 5.7 rods. I have built many 383's using sbc 400 rods and able to use 350 speed-pro 345 or 423 pistons. makes a simple 383 and is much cheaper. never have been able to tell the difference be tween a long rod or short rod 383. 400 rods have shorter rod bolts and no need to clearance anything except about .020 off the block rails. Simpler and cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bogies is like a walking encyclopedia and knows so much stuff its unreal.As far as you running 93 octane and not having any problems with detonation, if you have a tight quench and a good cooling system. I had a recent Dart SHP 377 build that had a smaller camshaft then what you had and I had around 180 to 190 psi cranking pressure and it was ragged edge at close to 10:1 and I was able to throw 89 octane in it and never had any problems with the few times I was able to run it but that is another long story.

I did not have the proper .040 quench that is what is recommended and mine was around .055 or so but it seemed to run good with being careful on the timing. From what I have read 9.5 is the limit for cast iron heads and 10.5 for aluminum heads on pump gas but there other factors factors in place as well. Your camshaft is on the starting point of bigger side of things and it causes lower pressure on the bottom end of things and always needs higher compression to help recover that loss and your compression ratio is right on the edge wise of being quite high for pump fuel but it will work well with your cam.

Many things comes into play such as vehicle weight and other factors such as rear gearing and transmission type and the load on the engine can all make things happen in different ways.

Hopefully your compression won't be too much.
90 octane is the highest we have in my area.
 

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You can buy those Enforcer castings on eBay as a bare casting under the proheader name.
You can then populate them with some Erson valves which have a divot in them, that will bring your combustion chamber up to about 68 cc's.

I can get you some part numbers tomorrow, or maybe someone else can chime in with a little better explanation.
It's always nice to have options when you're dialing in your compression ratio.

Edit.
I have this cam in my 406, which is basically the same motor with a little more bore.
It doesn't have a very smooth idle, but makes some really good torque with those heads.


Just another option for you. Plus the extra duration will knock down some of that static compression. You will have a real problem keeping tires on that T-Bucket though!
 

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OK, still do not get it, why build a 383 and use 5.7 rods. I have built many 383's using sbc 400 rods and able to use 350 speed-pro 345 or 423 pistons. makes a simple 383 and is much cheaper. never have been able to tell the difference be tween a long rod or short rod 383. 400 rods have shorter rod bolts and no need to clearance anything except about .020 off the block rails. Simpler and cheaper.
I used 6" rods for no other reason than I would be afforded the opportunity to have inexpensive internal balance . Now days new crank rods & pistons are so cost effective , why not ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
OK, still do not get it, why build a 383 and use 5.7 rods. I have built many 383's using sbc 400 rods and able to use 350 speed-pro 345 or 423 pistons. makes a simple 383 and is much cheaper. never have been able to tell the difference be tween a long rod or short rod 383. 400 rods have shorter rod bolts and no need to clearance anything except about .020 off the block rails. Simpler and cheaper.
You can buy those Enforcer castings on eBay as a bare casting under the proheader name.
You can then populate them with some Erson valves which have a divot in them, that will bring your combustion chamber up to about 68 cc's.

I can get you some part numbers tomorrow, or maybe someone else can chime in with a little better explanation.
It's always nice to have options when you're dialing in your compression ratio.
Tell me more I’m listening, I know those castings are wide used but not familiar with the Erson valves.
 

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Tell me more I’m listening, I know those castings are wide used but not familiar with the Erson valves.
I know Skip White puts them in his NKB heads, which is the same casting.
I bought a set from him to put in my build, because I needed 68cc Chambers to get down to 11 to 1 compression. I still have the part numbers at my shop, and I can get them for you tomorrow.
If you want to invest in a spring compressor, and a spring height micrometer, you can save yourself a little money by building the heads yourself.
It's not that difficult, especially with help from the guys on here!
Also I added to my post above with this camshaft as an option.

It makes really good power, and is matched good for those heads. But it may be a little Rowdy for you. It definitely doesn't have a smooth idle...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I know Skip White puts them in his NKB heads, which is the same casting.
I bought a set from him to put in my build, because I needed 68cc Chambers to get down to 11 to 1 compression. I still have the part numbers at my shop, and I can get them for you tomorrow.
If you want to invest in a spring compressor, and a spring height micrometer, you can save yourself a little money by building the heads yourself.
It's not that difficult, especially with help from the guys on here!
Also I added to my post above with this camshaft as an option.

It makes really good power, and is matched good for those heads. But it may be a little Rowdy for you. It definitely doesn't have a smooth idle...
Yes let me know. I got my pistons from Skip and wanted to get my rotating assembly there too as well as some of the accessories but shipping costs killed the deal so I only got the pistons. As for his heads he has them dialed in pretty good I did read on his page that he is switching to AFR’s.
 

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Be aware that if you buy unassembled heads in all likelihood the guides will not be reamed / honed to size , the seats will not be cut ,there'll be no spring locaters. Seals , springs , shims , keepers , guide plates provided with them & " most" new valves need a trip through the valve machine to address out of round/ concentric conditions .
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes let me know. I got my pistons from Skip and wanted to get my rotating assembly there too as well as some of the accessories but shipping costs killed the deal so I only got the pistons. As for his heads he has them dialed in pretty good I did read on his page that he is switching to AFR’s.
With nkb 68cc my cr would be 10.2 to 1, with 70cc it’s 10.0 to 1.
 
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