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hey all I have a fiero that I put a 3.4DOHC into, I love how it revs to the moon and makes power all the way. But I want more power and ive always wanted a muscle car so im going to put a small block chevy into it.

Id like to keep some of the high rpm characteristics but still make at least 450hp, so I need to decide on a platform. I was thinking of a 327, 383, 377, or a 400. I want to redline at 7000 but not drop torque until 6500, I dont care too much about low end power since its a light car. My budget max is about $3000

what should I do?

I would also like to read up as much as I can about small block chevy engines. I am experienced with 4cylinder turbo engines, but ive never done anything with pushrod motors or V8s in general. So does anybody know of some good books on building performance SBCs?
 

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For a high rpm motor my first choice would be a 377 then a 327 and you might want to look into a Chevy 302 if you want something that will really scream http://www.holisticpage.com/camaro/camaros/302.htm . Go with light weight forged parts good flowing heads and the right cam. I would think with a 302 in a Fiero you should be able to get pretty good gas mileage if you kept your foot out of it :)
 

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I totally agree with the 302/327 recommendation. They are the same 4" bore with either 3" or 3.25" strokes. You could also fit the 3.25" crank in a 400 block with bearing adapters on the mains. It would give you a neat big-bore 348, but I never trust the adapter bearings on a high-performance build.

Have you considered an LS1-family engine? They are very light and they have a few crank/bore options. They have great heads and I've seen several shoehorned into the fiero body so there must be some aftermarket support.
 

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I would think that you're going to need to be willing a lot more than $3000 to have a 7000 rpm engine that won't come apart on you (I'm going to borrow Xntrik's saying here) "suddenly, unexpectedly, and spectacularly". You can easily drop close to $1000 in the valvetrain alone, good machine shop work can be close to $1000, a good set of aftermarket heads is about $1000. Then you're probably going to want a forged crankshaft and pistons a set of connecting rods, and you still have your ignition system, intake, exhaust,cooling system, and all sorts of odds and ends things you never realized you need until you've made your fourth trip to the parts store in one day.

I agree that a Gen III/IV engine would be a neat idea too, again if you're willing to spend more than $3000 on the engine and electronic controls for it. An LS6 like the ones out of the 01-05(?) Z06 Corvettes would be very cool and would be pretty much exactly what you're looking for.
 

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Alternately, consider the 355 CI engine buildups I use for bracket racing on a budget. The key to coming in on budget is finding a good rebuildable core, which is getting more difficult these days.

I locate a stock 350 with a standard bore and good production cast crank. Bore the block 0.030” and if required grind the crank 0.010”. Two choices for rods, resize originals with good bolts or scat I beams, I like to use the aftermarket rods to convert to floating pins. Light weight flat top pistons and balancing is a must.

The key to performance is a good flowing cylinder head and camshaft, budget determines the choices, if funding permits I go with the RHS or Dart heads, 64cc chambers and 200 to 220 cc intake runners. I mill the heads to optain the desired compression ratio.

Camshaft selection is critical best left to a professional; I use Mr. John at bullet. With the stated budget, a flat tappet camshaft fits the bill.

Victor Jr. intake, holley 750 carb. and MSD ignition finish off the combination.

I have been running these for years and years with great success, 500 HP is obtainable and reliability to 7000 RPM is good. With all the extras needed you’ll likely overspend but you would be hard pressed to duplicate the performance per $ going any other route.
 

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Personally a would say if you can get the 400 style block a 377ci(Destroked)would be a good bet.I put one in a little Datzun280Z
377ci 10.7:1
Edelbrock E-Tec200 heads
1.60 pro-magnum roller rockers
294 comp solid cam
Gear drive(double rollers are fine also)
Victor intake
and a holley double pumper 750cfm carb
It made an awesome top end.power up and past 7000rpm.I think it made more horses than a similiar 383 I built.But most of the time the 383 was more preferable for our street cars because of the extra torque.
If a 377 is out of budget.A 350 would rev plenty high enough.I think GM sells blocks for 600 or 800 dollars.And you could put a 327crank or 302 in it.
A 327 would be a really good choice if you drive the car more often.
 

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If you really want a screamer I'd throw a 3" stroke in a 305 block- which will require an expensive aftermartket crank. Really though for 7000 rpm your cheapest route will be a 350- they can take that as long as they are prepped right- full forged assembley, the dart heads as recomended, roller rockers, solid flat tappet cam, Vic Jr. or torker intake (only torker if clearance is needed). For pump gas reasons I would stick with about 9.7:1 on iron heads- I've ran higher and so have others, but its safer that way for your first build. valve train stability and not breaking a rod will be your primary two concerns.
 

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ap72 said:
"If you really want a screamer I'd throw a 3" stroke in a 305 block"

That same 3" crank in a 350 block gives you a 302. Same potential for RPM, but head choice is vastly superior and 39 more cubic inches.
350 blocks are as plentiful as 305's.
JA
 

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automotive breath said:
Alternately, consider the 355 CI engine buildups I use for bracket racing on a budget. The key to coming in on budget is finding a good rebuildable core, which is getting more difficult these days.

I locate a stock 350 with a standard bore and good production cast crank. Bore the block 0.030” and if required grind the crank 0.010”. Two choices for rods, resize originals with good bolts or scat I beams, I like to use the aftermarket rods to convert to floating pins. Light weight flat top pistons and balancing is a must.

The key to performance is a good flowing cylinder head and camshaft, budget determines the choices, if funding permits I go with the RHS or Dart heads, 64cc chambers and 200 to 220 cc intake runners. I mill the heads to optain the desired compression ratio.

Camshaft selection is critical best left to a professional; I use Mr. John at bullet. With the stated budget, a flat tappet camshaft fits the bill.

Victor Jr. intake, holley 750 carb. and MSD ignition finish off the combination.

I have been running these for years and years with great success, 500 HP is obtainable and reliability to 7000 RPM is good. With all the extras needed you’ll likely overspend but you would be hard pressed to duplicate the performance per $ going any other route.

Im shocked at how much power a cast GM crank/stock forging rods will handle. They will last when the assembly is well balanced and you use good fasteners. I ran a similar combo for years with a 7k shift point and NEVER had an issue. I have also seen them pushed past the breaking point and man does it tear up LOTS of stuff. Makes for a great show at the track.
 
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