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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I need your guys' (and gals') advice. For some reason it hit me over my week off that I'm in the wrong field, completely! I guess I knew that, but I was planning on applying to graduate programs this year (masters of science in X field) but now I'm pretty sure I don't want to do that either. What I really want to do is get into mechanical engineering. The issue is I'm really not quite sure how to get my foot in the door! I do have a degree from a good school, but its in a pretty unrelated field. I guess in a perfect world I would start working for a manufacturer (big three are just down the street) and take classes that I need at the same time...

So needless to say I'm pretty confused as to how I get to my end-goal. Do any of you guys have any helpful suggestions?!

Thanks a bunch in advance. I'm geeked and clueless at the same time...

K
 

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im on a highway to hell
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i dont know to much about this but mech. engeneering is a big field can you be a bit more specific as to what you have in mind?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
automotive design. I'd probably be most interested in drivetrain and chassis things. I wouldn't want to go so far as into the aerospace stuff stuff...

K
 

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im on a highway to hell
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well i dont know about michigan but if i was looking in mass. id start with MIT'S web site maybe there are some good colleges for that around there?
 

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Most engineering programs are generic for the first two years with the last 2+ getting into specific disciplines,ie Civil, Mechanical, Chemical, Electrical, Metallurgical etc. Even when you receive a degree, each employment opportunity narrows the specialization such as your desires of drive trains. One of my brothers received a Chemical Engineering degree and went to work for the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. For the first year, he and all the new hires were in a pool that went from one department to the next to get a look at each one and let the department heads look at them. At the end of the year, each newbie was allowed to rank the departments from most desirable to least desirable and the heads did the same. My Bro ended up in the maintenance department, which was his #1 choice and he was the head's #1 choice. He remained there to become the head until selected by the Pres to head up the Nuc waste cleanup. He took an early retirement to become a Nuc waste clean up consultant and has not looked back since. Out of this long tale is a lesson: The degree opens the door; after that, it is up to you to go where you want.

Another example is my wife's deceased brother-in-law. He went to work for FMCo in Dearborn in the early 50s and ended up in Design. Years of night school at Wayne State, coupled with his work experience earned him Design Engineer status with Ford. He loved his work (always 5 years down the road) and retired after 44 years. Unfortunately, he died within 3 years retirement. His favorite project: the sixty four and one half Mustang.

Both of these examples are from bigger and better times, but there are still requirements for these skills and you are right in looking toward the Big Three for the opportunities. Do some home work by checking with the Personnel Department (Human Resources?) of each of the Big Three and talk with their Training Specialist to see if they can steer you into what is important for them and branch out from there. It only costs you some time!!

Trees
 
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