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Discussion Starter #1
OK, guys, first this place has been a wealth of info. Some of you guys have forgotten more about paint than I will ever know and your experience and expertise has been greatly appreciated. However, now I have a little problem because I tried to cut a corner. I have trolled here a while but finally had to register since I can not find answers for this one. (or I might just be still searching for an answer I like)

OK< So I had read that I should not get mask film at the hardware store to build my makeshift paint booth in the garage, but the auto store was out of anything short of a giant box. So, guess what I did. Well things were going great. Hood of my sons jeep was in the garage a prepped, masking booth made by film hanging over and off of all the garage door tracks.

Primer went on well, three coats of red SS urethane went on smooth, feeling pretty good since I was doing this with my only gun I still had in good shape, Sata mini. Only one light sag on the side. Feeling really good!!!

Sitting there with my son having a beer (me, he is only 17) and then....Daughters boyfriend opens the pedestrian door of the garage and the wind hits that masking film! Jeep hood now looks like a giant red golf ball with dimples.

Started sanding this morning and of course the particles made it too deep to sand out.

So, here is the questions. How much will a hi build primer fill in? Since I have not sanded all the way down to the very deepest part of the dimples, would primer even stick to those unsanded areas? Is it time to just sand the whole dang thing back down beyond the color coat and start over? FYI, if it matters, I was using Nason ful-fil acrylic 1k primer and Nason ful-thane 2k urethan SS in red.

Thanks for all the help in advance. And yes, the very first thing I am doing before I spray this thing again is getting another gun! I have a Devilbiss OMX from years (maybe decades) ago that I have never even taken out of the box. Anybody got thoughts on that thing? I have heard mixed reviews. Is there a decent gun out there for a hobbyist that will do the job for this and not cost me 200 bucks?
 

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Slow but willing learner
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5,153 Posts
You really don't want un-needed paint build up if you can avoid it. If it was slick enough for you to paint it the first time, you can sand it down until it is slick enough for you to paint it again. I believe you will be glad you did.

John
 

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True Hotrodder
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Yea it's a pain but if you don't sand it back down you're going to end up with the paint probably popping and/or cracking at a later time. I am not familiar with the gun you mentioned but took a look and I would say if you have the right size tip and provide the air flow it wants, you should be good to go. One thing I do sometimes is hang a good sized piece of cardboard up and paint it. I can adjust the gun until I get a good flow and pattern that I like. And if that doesn't work, you were successful with the Sata the first time.
 

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The Penny Pincher
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Lacquer primer is absolutely the worst thing you could have used.
It takes several (or longer) days to dry and stop shrinking.
I hope you gave plenty of time before painting over that stuff.
It also is not water proof and won't adhere well to bare metal.
If you are going to sand it down again, use a 2k primer and
you will also get a better fill to level it out.
 

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True Hotrodder
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Nothing wrong with lacquer primer if you know how to use it correctly and that does include giving it time to dry out and shrink. Once all the body work is completed and primer is solid smooth, a couple of coats of sealer can be used, personally I prefer DTM reduced as a sealer - works really nice. Then base/clear or single stage - whatever the budget allows.
 

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The Penny Pincher
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I know very well the short comings of lacquer primer after spraying
many gallons of it back in the 1970's and into the 80's.
I've seen first hand how a 1k product holds up.
If you're going to use that, you might as well paint your car with
rattle cans, it's the same stuff, a 1k product that dries instead of cures.
Todays 2K primers are 10 times better and that's why body shops don't use lacquers.
At least, not the reputable ones.
 

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Slow but willing learner
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5,153 Posts
I know very well the short comings of lacquer primer after spraying
many gallons of it back in the 1970's and into the 80's.
I've seen first hand how a 1k product holds up.
If you're going to use that, you might as well paint your car with
rattle cans, it's the same stuff, a 1k product that dries instead of cures.
Todays 2K primers are 10 times better and that's why body shops don't use lacquers.
At least, not the reputable ones.
JC Is giving you good advice. Not only is the acrylic laquer technology obsolete, the solvents in the new urethanes are so hot they will soften the primer and it will do some really bad things. Stick with 2k urethane, polyester, or epoxy products under your paint.

BTW JC, I was raised in St. Marrhews. Graduated from Waggener in '63. :D

John
 

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True Hotrodder
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I think everyone understands that 2k products are far better than 1k stuff. The deal to me is that not everyone is ready to deal with 2k products, including the cost and safety aspects or maybe they're doing a home job and the neighbors are a bit too close for that stuff. Lacquers were used for years and years and provided excellent paint jobs - but they also have a lot of problems. The biggest issue today is that color coats in a good lacquer are cost prohibitive to most of us. There is also the end use of the vehicle, if I'm flipping a product I'll shoot SS on it and wave goodbye. Or even if I am keeping it, the vehicle may not warrant putting expensive product on it. But bottomline to me is that if I have want to do a lot of blocking on a panel to get it straight, I'll keep throwing lacquer primer at it because I am sanding most of it off, then seal it. And I think that's what the OP was trying to get done.
 

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The Penny Pincher
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Nothing wrong with single stage, urethane is one of the toughest paints out there.
I've used it a lot, I've also done a lot of acrylic enamel jobs (w/ hardener) in the 80's
that got rubbed out and looked like a show car finish, and they held up great.
 

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I agree with the replies. Never put more product on than you absolutely need. I've had some really nice paint jobs go bad after time because of it.
As far as the paint gun question goes, I would go ahead and use the OMX. It's not the top of the line but it's not the bottom of the barrel either. I use SATA guns but they're very expensive. However, I have sprayed with some cheap guns before and had good luck. I believe we have a couple of ATD Tool gravity guns at work that have held up nicely over the years.
 
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