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64Joker
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324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just replaced both lower and upper radiator hoses (old ones were collapsing at high rpms). After driving the car yesterday in 100+ degree weather and then checking the newer hoses today (without starting the engine or driving the car), that both new hoses were in a "collapsed" condition. But after removing the radiator cap, both hoses went back to an inflated (normal) condition? As if there was a vacuum lock or something.
Would this be normal, any ideas????

1964 Chevy Impala
327 cui
 

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joker

check the thermostat.

also, if it's a '64 impala you should

have the correct pressure Stantz radiator cap

plus the ever popular Pep Boys white nylon over

flow tank mounted on the radiator support.

have a nice day!
 

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I just replaced both lower and upper radiator hoses (old ones were collapsing at high rpms). After driving the car yesterday in 100+ degree weather and then checking the newer hoses today (without starting the engine or driving the car), that both new hoses were in a "collapsed" condition. But after removing the radiator cap, both hoses went back to an inflated (normal) condition? As if there was a vacuum lock or something.
Would this be normal, any ideas????

1964 Chevy Impala
327 cui
The radiator cap has a valve that should vent hot expanded coolant out when the cap's pressure limit is exceeded. It should also allow the return of coolant when the pressure drops as the engine cools. If it doesn't or isn't doing this a vacuum will form inside the cooling system and the hoses will collapse. More on that later, but first:

If you do not have an over-flow container you should purchase one and install it. As you get into the 1960's the OEMs began to use these in regular production to catch the radiator hot fluid over flow instead of dumping it on the ground as in the good ol' days. That rather comes with the change from water and pump lubricant as the cooling medium to "Prestone" type glycols mixed with water. The then commonly used ethylene glycol being poisonous, so just exhausting the stuff on the ground was no longer a suitable option.

Back to hoses; the upper hose does not have any internal support that would prevent it come collapsing when a vacuum forms within the cooling system so this is normal. The lower hose since it is subjected to low pressure by the suction on the pump inlet, these usually have a support spring inside them to prevent their collapse when the pressure inside is less than atmospheric outside. I'd check on this so as to be sure the pump suction can't collapse this hose.

Bogie
 

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64Joker
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324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update

Well, you guys were right, it was a hose, but not the radiator hoses!
I had previously installed an after-market overflow tank and when installing the overflow hose to the tank, I accidently had the overflow hose pinched so there was no escape for the radiator water pressure! Replaced the hose and rerouted it, problem solved! Thanks!
 
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