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1968 Chevy C-10
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My favorite uncle who is retired and was a body man from the 60’s came out of retirement to help me do the body work on my 68 C-10. I will be posting pics to back up my statements. He is teaching me the old school body work and metal forming techniques and is allowing me to use his tools. With the techniques he’s teaching me this is gonna be a long process as my goal is after body work is done no bondo will be used. Rusted out places will be cut out and new pieces from my donor truck will be welded in those places. I don’t want to start any arguments but uncle Lonnie said he can help me achieve my goal.
 

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Sweet! It's good to learn from the old timers before that Is lost.

I'm in the middle of doing a bunch of custom work and painting my daily complete right now. I don't have the patience to metal finish anything. I love Bondo!
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Grand Prix user
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5,443 Posts
Enjoy your learning experience and truck, and tell Uncle Lonnie hey for me. I ain't here to debate and just won't argue but by my own estimation am someone fit to speak humbly on this subject. In the interest of making things better for you in the long run.

The old school phrase can be misleading. Pretty much just means a younger person is speaking. I'm 55. We have a few more options than the fire wrench now, but modern steel sheetmetal repair on classics hasn't really changed since they were made. Who pays what to get the work done is the driving factor behind crummy old road sign as floor type repairs or astounding Pebble Beach type restoration you may find, and the sellable asset one develops through experience is the ability to match the repair to the money and quality expectations. Success lies in finding balance.

In other words, your finesse with the technique and quality slider adjustment on a job such as this is likely to be a huge factor in the success of the project. The more advanced you become, the range of repair options you can offer widens. So like if you're a tachometer, you can support an 8000 RPM redline with new skills as opposed to six grand as you were. Trouble is, how much life does a tach spend between six and eight grand? Not much, I say. Questioning the practicality of the redline upgrade. See?

The fact is that there are not customers for filler-free work. A guy who has learned to do that as a hobbyist may end up with questionable bragging rights on the thing he did so on, and get that respect... maybe even go on to make a career of it. Back someone who has into a corner and interrogate them and you'll find fill-free classic ride metal repair just isn't something that comes up. Plus they don't really want that kind of work.

Not advice, just input. Now show us what ya got. :)
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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5,647 Posts
Good luck with it. Hopefully you have"it".
I've been shaping for a while now and I know I will never have "it". (Old dogs, new tricks I guess)
I'm stuck with using filler for sure. However, it's quite satisfying making my own custom parts from scratch.
 
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