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Hello all, I know this is a foolish question but, here goes. I have an 84 Mustang and the passenger side door got hit and needs replaced. Is there any use in trying to match a non OEM color? I really don't need it to be perfect but, I really don't want to primer it. The door I got is black and black wont do. I'm not looking for perfection, close would be good enough. I live in Maryland and any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Tom
 

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yes.. many company's make paint color matching devices.. PPG uses a special camera.. I had some interior vinyl matched so my car would be color matched... ended up with a dead match, with the PPG camera and a very well rated paint jobber
 

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The paint stores can get you close, but there is still quite a lot of skill in making that close color match. Just because the paint store can give you a color does not mean it is going to match perfectly. How you spray it can make the difference from a good match to a no match.

Vince
 

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Have to agree with Vince here. The jobber can only bring you so far. The unknown variable is the painter. Using a cheap or improperly maintained gun, not mixing the paint properly (especially metallic’s), or adding an additive can all singularly or collectively result in poor color match.
 

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I don't think its possible to get a perfect match, how long has the paint been on the car? is it a metallic? Either way, you should blend it into the next panel by slowing diluting your base with clear.
 

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Yes, paint your door then dilute your paint with about 20 percent clear and lay that on the fender and quarter about 4-6 inches in, then 40% clear and a little farther into the fender and quarter, so your eye cant distinguish the difference.
 

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Ok, before I'm ready to paint I will buff, then hand rub the door and quarter that I'm going to blend. After which, I discharge any static electricity created from buffing. I then proceed to masking and papering the car as though I was going to shoot both doors and quarter. Then mask and paper the front door and quarter leaving the rear passenger door exposed for coloring.

After shooting the door, I remove the paper exposing the complete front door and quarter panels for blending. Cover all areas with adhesion promoter. Reduce my mix and start bending and working further out and reducing more as I go. Then finish with clear coat over the entire area.

Haven't had a bad blend or a complaint yet.

PS. Your not being insulting. Your asking a legitimate question.
 

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damn, maybe i'm doing it wrong, its always turned out alright, nothing ever comes out great, despite how much i clean the garage its still horribly dusty. my uncle told me thats how it was done and I did it and it came out alright so figured it was just lack of skill or all the something else messing it up. You sound like you know what your talking about so I'll admit defeat. Touche'
 

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Just an additional note. I don't use reducer at all. I use dupont 3661S with everything I finish coat. Fast dry thinner (any brand available) for primers and 2K. Again, I keep expenses and inventory down.
 
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