Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys, I am replacing a clutch anyway I removed the pilot Bearing
from the crank shaft but notice that its of a solid type as opposed to the new
Timken one I purchased, so my question is which one is better.

1 Timken ball bearing type
2 Original Solid Type "Non bearing type"

I could see the bearing type possibly causing a problem due to moving
parts, but the solid one has no moving parts so I am leaning to it instead.

Both are the same size.. I attach a pic so you can see what I mean.

btw the hack marks on the Original was before I got a bearing puller which is
a real handy tool for this type of job ! :)

Thanks for your time.

X711
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
pilot bearing

My first choice is always the bearing.I have resolved noise issues in 4wd applications so I have been sold ever since .Some people have concerns if the bearing fails it damages the input shaft.In 30 years I have never seen a pilot bearing or bushing fail .Go with the bearing .Good luck
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,400 Posts
I would lean toward the solid one, only because I have never used the bearing type. Either way, make sure they are greased.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Poncho, I believe your right on this.. The Original one looked ok prior to my hacking. I think the bearing type is a weak link and would just hate for it to go out !

Over time the grease in the bearing type will disappear due to heat. a little bit
of grit could get in there and puff games up !, bearings get destroyed ..

Thanks...X711
 

·
when will it rain???
Joined
·
1,295 Posts
x711 said:
Poncho, I believe your right on this.. The Original one looked ok prior to my hacking. I think the bearing type is a weak link and would just hate for it to go out !

Over time the grease in the bearing type will disappear due to heat. a little bit
of grit could get in there and puff games up !, bearings get destroyed ..

Thanks...X711
personally i take the bearing over the bushing everytime... the bearing has a lip seal on 1 end to keep the grease in if installed correctly, and 2nd, i never grease a bushing, ull be pulling it back out in months if u do... the bushing needs to be impregnated with atf. ( u can actually see the fluid come out the sides. use ur finger to plug the center, take a cup with fluid and pour in hole till at top, then use ur thumb to press..) it will last either way with good install practices.
 

·
Race it, Don't rice it!
Joined
·
7,734 Posts
I bought a pilot bearing once and fit it to the trans input shaft just to make sure it was the right size and fit then proceeded to install it. About 3 days later and several missed races due to clutch failures, the bearing was found to be a one way bearing. I've used those kinds of bearing before but apparently this one was misslabled or something. I kept sticking my finger in the bearing and turning it and making sure it was still smooth and it always felt free. By mistake I found it. My headach was relived right then an there. 7 or 8 tranmission and clutch removals in two days! messing with a rather tempemental triple disk clutch at that. Bushing are good for me now. Just to stay away from that mess.
 

·
Certified Lead Foot
Joined
·
518 Posts
Bushings work just fine for most applications. To use the bearings properly, you MUST index the bell housing to insure the bearing and shaft are running true.

If you have any slight diflection, the bearing will be loaded wrong and will fail. Usually when they fail, they keep the pilot shaft turning so you have to get the tranny into neutral or you will stay in motion even with the pedal floored.
 

·
Lost in the 60's
Joined
·
15,259 Posts
I have used only the solid bushings for over 40 years....and I never put any grease or lubricant on them and I have never had a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Pontiacs and Chevy trucks had bearings from the factory. I've never had a bearing failure but I've replaced lots of bushings.
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
Bushings have provided millions of miles of trouble free operations. Lubricating is not an issue since all that I know of are made from a material I think is called oilite that has lubricant impregnated in it. My Bud, the master tool and die maker, made one for my old Bronco and it has been trouble free for years.

Trees
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,622 Posts
I think for most Applications the Bushings work just fine, but in almost all Trucks and Tractors you'll find a Bearing, and they usually provide hundreds of thousands (or hours) of trouble free miles-must be something good about 'em-
 

·
Hotrodders.com Moderator
Joined
·
6,391 Posts
I have only seen 1 bearing break. Never have seen a bushing completly fail but they do wear and should be replaced when the clutch is replaced. I have never lubricated one as I beleive as above they are self lubricating. Always be sure the baring/bushing fits on the input shaft before re-assembly.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,766 Posts
I've seen many bearings fail/sieze up... this wears out the pilot shaft of the transmission input shaft.

There were some repair kits out for certain applications...... I don't work on manual trannys as a rule though.

:D
 

·
Race it, Don't rice it!
Joined
·
7,734 Posts
Remember that anytime the clutch is in or engaged with the tranny in neutral, the shaft and and crank are turning the same rpm. same goes for clutch out and in gear, that leaves the tranny in gear and the clutch in, would be the only time that bearing is doing anything but being a support. Basicly street light and stop signs. You can get alot of miles out of a car with few revolutions on that bearing or bushing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I had purchased an autogear m22 from George (He manufactures them) and talking with him about the pilot bearing issue. He said the pilot bushing is fine. But! make sure it is not impregnated with steel. And how to tell the difference is if it sticks to a magnet, the bronze one won't. So I checked my replacement one and sure enough it stuck to the magnet and checked my old one and that one was bronze. So I had to do some hunting to find a new one. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Just a couple of pennies!

After rereading your post the question I have is what application are you using this for. Not that it matters that much really. Are you racing this or is it a daily?

I think that both would work well, but to truly answer your question of which is best ... I believe it would be which one are you more comfortable with. Both have their own track records. Both work and everyone could tell you their favorite.

Me, I've always used a bushing even when the bearing was available. Bought a kit once and it had both types. Now what do I do?

Just go with what you think is the best for what your doing. I'd be willing to bet you won't have any trouble with either one. Just my couple of pennies worth.

Pappy
 

·
Hotrodders.com Moderator
Joined
·
2,783 Posts
bearing

I recommend the solid bushing.. I have seen the bearings spin in the crank shaft destroying the bore, i have seen them blow up and ruin the input shaft....

I have never had a single issue with the solid busings...


keith
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top