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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm in the process of putting a pilot bushing into the crank of my SB chevy (LT1). It wasn't going in, so I put it in the freezer for an hour and was able to get it this far.

Is this about how far it's supposed to go in? Or should it be flush? How are you supposed to tell?

Also, this was mated to an automatic previously and there wasn't a pilot bushing in there, so I didn't have to remove anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply. That's what I've been reading elsewhere, make it flush.

But man I've been beating this thing for a good hour and it's still a good 1/16 to 1/8 out.

I'm beginning to wonder if maybe there's something in the back there that is stopping it. I cleaned it out but there was some light rust on the inside there. I couldn't decide what was better, sanding the light bit of rust out and maybe ruining the hole, or just hammering it in.

How crucial is it to have it flush? This is the first manual car I've ever dealt with so sorry for the noob questions.
 

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Check the pilot shaft on the trans. It should show the depth it was at in the last installation. Chances are there is plenty of room to leave the bushing where it is right now.
I would also try to slide the actual shaft (not alignment tool) into the pilot before assembly to make sure it isnt deformed.
It looks like it is deep enough to me, as I said , check the wear pattern on the shaft itself, to gauge how much room you have for error.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hey thanks for the reply. I was able to get it a little more in by using 2 hammers, on with 2 flats that rested aginset the bushing, and the other hitting that hammer. The log was part of the problem before.

And after looking at the input shaft of the trans and just putting them together, I think it will be ok.


thanks again
 

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Just remember...the harder you hit the pilot bushing the harder you're hitting the crank thrust bearing, don't use a 12 lb. sledge:)
X2...that was also a concern I had after viewing the spot on the "tool" that has bottomoed out. You can see the marks where it is just banging the flange on the crank and not the bushing.
Just pointing that out. It may allready be at its bottom.
 

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thanks for the reply. That's what I've been reading elsewhere, make it flush.

But man I've been beating this thing for a good hour and it's still a good 1/16 to 1/8 out.

I'm beginning to wonder if maybe there's something in the back there that is stopping it. I cleaned it out but there was some light rust on the inside there. I couldn't decide what was better, sanding the light bit of rust out and maybe ruining the hole, or just hammering it in.

How crucial is it to have it flush? This is the first manual car I've ever dealt with so sorry for the noob questions.
It is perfectly OK to have it slightly proud of the crank bushing hole. You will likely see that a good portion of a bushing in the end of the crank that the tranny came from was basically unworn on the end towards the front of the engine, so having the bushing slightly out of the hole will potentially provide more support. Obviously you don't want to over do this.

Be very careful to not beat on the bushing any more than absolutely necessary- as in stop now. It is made of sintered bronze and can crumble/fracture if over worked.
 
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