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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building rebuilding a 1966 396 engine to drop in my 68 Camaro. When it came to mount the Muncie transmission up to the engine, I was going to put in the pilot bushing that came with the clutch kit I purchased from Summit. Looking at the end of the crankshaft where the bushing or bearing would go I cant figure out what to do because it almost appears that the crankshaft was never properly milled out to accept a pilot bushing. Or is there already a bushing in there that is just much thicker?

This is my first BBC engine build and I would appreciate any help anyone can give.

View attachment 614145

And here is a pic of me holding the pilot bushing that came with the clutch kit I purchased.

View attachment 614146

Do I need to have a machinist make the hole bigger in order to accept the pilot bushing or is there a different size bushing already in place.

I hope this makes sense.

Thanks in advance.
 

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If the input shaft go in thats fine. If the hole in the original bush is to small your best bet would be to 1# get a new bush with the right O/D and I/D sizes or 2# get a new original size bush and have in machined to the right I/D then fit it. Going on what " cerial " says about using bread. First you get a length of bar with an O/D the same as the bushing I/D then fill the hole with bread follow by the bar. Then give the end of the bar a good hit to compress the bread . You will have to keep repacking with more bread and the bush will come out.
 

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High Performance Rear Ends
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It looks like your 396 had a manual transmission behind it before because there is already a bushing in the crankshaft. I have had many big blocks and many cranks and I don't remember ever seeing a bushing that large before. It looks like it has been installed in the part of the crank where the torque converter would run. There should be a smaller hole in the crank behind this bushing where your bushing would go.
 

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High Performance Rear Ends
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The one that he is holding is the right size. The one that is in the crankshaft is oversize and is in the area that the torque converter is supposed to go in. The hole for the pilot bushing is behind this oversize bushing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The one that he is holding is the right size. The one that is in the crankshaft is oversize and is in the area that the torque converter is supposed to go in. The hole for the pilot bushing is behind this oversize bushing.
Thanks for all of the feedback. I was able to pull the bushing out using bread and this is what it looked like after I pulled it out. It now looks like the bushing I ordered will fit in the hole.

614149


Here is what I was able to pull out using the bread trick. It almost looks like someone had inserted 2 bushings because it came out in 2 pieces.

614150


I placed the bushing that I ordered in the freezer and will attempt to put it in tomorrow. I am assuming I should clean out the existing hole a little and put a little grease or WD-40 on the bushing and use a socket and hammer to press it in. Does that sound right?

Thanks again everyone!!!
 

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More for Less Racer
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The one you took out is called an extended pilot bushing, that's why it had the bigger diameter end section on it.
The are used when engine mid-mount plate, ring gear sheild, and or bellhousing block saver plate is sandwiched in-between the block and bellhousing, to make up for the thickness of those plates and ensure you still have good support.
Mostly a race thing, see them a lot in circle track cars

You'll also find them used for some transmission swaps, such as Ford Toploader 4-speed behind a non-Ford engine, Mopar A-833 swap, etc.
 

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Did your new bushing stick to a magnet? It doesn't look like Oilite (tm) so its not self-lubricating. You can put a very small amount of grease in the bushing. You don't want so much that it flings grease all over the clutch.
 

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57-61 283 and 348 engines that came with the Turboglide transmissions did't have the crank flanges completely machined (who knows why?). When guys went to install a manual transmission, they had to get a "special' bushing; your bushing that was in the 396's flange looks like one of those bushings, but I have no idea why anyone would use one in this case. Maybe they had it laying around and just stuck it in? The Dorman part number for that "special" bushing is 690-035; 690-034 is for the "normal" bushing. One other possible reason, it was used with an adapter bell-housing setup, and came with the conversion.
 

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Burnt out transmission tech.
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57-61 283 and 348 engines that came with the Turboglide transmissions did't have the crank flanges completely machined (who knows why?). When guys went to install a manual transmission, they had to get a "special' bushing; your bushing that was in the 396's flange looks like one of those bushings, but I have no idea why anyone would use one in this case. Maybe they had it laying around and just stuck it in? The Dorman part number for that "special" bushing is 690-035; 690-034 is for the "normal" bushing. One other possible reason, it was used with an adapter bell-housing setup, and came with the conversion.
Gad. I shudder when I see Turboglide. Same with Flight Pitch. Or Buick Special.
 
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