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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents,

I have done a little research on piston selection and I wanted to get some input on what you all might recommend along with some other recommendations.

I am building a large journal 327 SBC and it is going in a 1929 Roadster. The set up so far is:

4 bolt main block (going .060 over)
Weiand Tunnel Ram with two 450 Holley's
Probably some World Sportsman II heads w/ 200 cc runners 64cc chambers(haven't decided quit yet on exact head or if I should buy them complete or bare castings)
Roller Hydraulic Cam with around a .550-.590 lift (again haven't decided exact brand yet)
Scat Rods and Unknown Pistons
Forged Large Journal 327 Crank that is .10/.20
Turbo 350 w/ 3500 Stall
Narrowed Ford 9" with 3.73's

My questions are these:

1. With this being mainly a weekend warrior rod (and I am hoping with some street cruising time), what type of pistons would you guys recommend, FORGED or HYPEREUTECTIC pistons and what compression ratio should I look to run? 10 to 1?

2. Any input on the World Sportsman II heads with this set up? Brodix or Dart pros cons? Bare castings and buy roller cam kit or do something different?

3. What hydraulic roller cam should I look at? And would it be better to get some bare casting heads (Sportsmans, Brodix or Dart) and then get the complete hydraulic roller kit with springs, valves, etc? I have heard a lot of negative things about Comp Cams but I have been out of the motor building hobby for a while so I am seeking input on what brands of camshafts are at the front of the pack these days and whether it is better to purchase the entire matched camshift kit or purchase some assembled heads to match the cam I end up selecting.

Any and all constructive input is appreciated. This rookie needs help! Thanks.

Brent
 

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engine

For your application a properly set-up hypereutectic piston is fine. If you have some extra money a forged piston would give you a bit more durability from the "missed the tune" standpoint.

I have been around about every small block chevy head built. I have also had my fair share of them across the flow bench and with that data i would choose a Dart head every time over most of the others for out of the box performance and quality. Again working on this stuff all the time, No head is ready out of the box. You can bolt them on and go but they are not as good as they can be with a little tune up work. The biggest deal is the valve job, again they will lap, but they are hardly ever close to be right. So i would buy the bare head and have the machine shop set it up for you. Unless you have a machine shop that not up with the newest technology on valve jobs, then you best to just buy a complete head.

I need way more information before i can pick you a cam. The cam is the next to the last thing you buy. I need a final compression ratio, what heads etc, then a cam can be decided on.

Keith
 

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IMO the Sportsman II's are gonna be too big for a 327 unless you plan on spinning this thing high all the time. Couple that with the tunnel ram and a fairly big cam and I would say that low end grunt isn't going to be this engines strong point. Peak torque will probably be well above where your torque converter comes in.
 

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This thing will definitely want to spin so I'd recomend an even higher gear. Hyper pistons will alst if tuned properly but as already stater forged provide extra insurance if it is not tuned properly. You didn't specify rod length, I'd use 6" if you haven't bought them yet, with the short 327 stroke it helps take some off piston weight and again will help with revving.

I've seen/heard a lot of good about both Dart and RHS heads- I'd go with one of them. Bare castings so you can clean them up and get the springs that are matched to your cam, not just some generic ones.

For a cam I'd go over to Speedtalk.com and ask them for a grind- there's a lot of cam grinders on there that know their stuff and will be happy to make one just for your combo, it'll cost a little more but the results will be well worth it.

As long as you use quality parts it looks like you'll have one little mean street machine on your hands. Just remember to do it right the first time so you don't have to do it twice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey gents,

Thanks for all of the replies. I will get the casting number and deck height question answered on Monday.

Having said that, does anyone see why these rods:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/SB-C...ptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories


and these pistons:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/KEIT...ptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

would not work in my 350 block to make a large journal 327 motor?

I feel pretty confident that they will work but I just want confirmation before I start firming things up. I will be using 64cc heads so I think I might want to get a little bit more of a dome on the pistons to up the compression? I'm thinking I want to be around 10 to 1 with this motor.


I am also open to some suggestions on head selection. I am going to do with Dart cast iron heads so any input you guys can give on runner size along with suggestions for a hydraulic roller cam (retro fit) would be much appreciated as well.

Thanks again for helping the rookie out.
 

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Your rod and piston selection will work, but why not go to a more modern and lighter group of pieces. KB forged piston is a good piece, but I would look to use a Scat I-beam rod instead, and make it in the 6 to 6.200" length range. This will allow the piston to be much lighter and the whole assembly lighter and easier to balance.

I would use the I-beam rod even if I used the 5.7 rod and the piston you linked, H-beam is overkill.

Dart has a 50 cc chamber size offered in the Iron Eagle line, I'd go with them and rework the chamber to finalize your compression ratio. I have a set of Sportsman I've had for years, I wouldn't even consider them, Iron Eagles are far better.

Any reason why you are building this as a 327?? Just because you have the crank(it's nothing special)?? You are replacing the rest of the rotating assembly, get a crank and go 383, it will be a more user friendly engine. It will idle better and make more low end power with the longer stroke and increased inches, and work much better with the tunnel ram if used alot on the street.

All that said, nothing wrong with the "old school" parts you picked, they will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input Eric. I will consider the 6" rod in an I beam configuration. No real reason on the 327 as opposed to a 350 or 383 stroker. I just loved the 327 motor growing up as a kid. The short stroke and quick wind up just always got my blood moving :D

I have also been looking at the Speed Pro forged pistons and the Speed Pro moly rings. Do you have any input on their products?

I am also trying to figure out this entire "floating pin" vs. a "pressed pin" idea. A "bushed pin" the same thing as a "floating pin" correct? This motor will see some street time as well as track time so I will be beating the crap out of it. Whatever I have been able to find on the topic seems to indicate that "floating pins" are more suited for race motors. Is there any problem or down side to using them on a street / strip motor?
 

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Building a unique machine such as a 29 roadster requires a unique engine as well in my opinion. go old school get the engine worked over, perhaps find a 283 crank to match your rods and pistons and build a 302, that old school and unique
 

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31....I have a '64 327 (now a 331) in my '32 Victoria ...still in the build process but the engine has been fired, broken in and runs great. I used Speed Pro hypereutectics and their moly rings. I bought them from "Racers Outlet" in Indiana, ph. (515) 961-6109. The prices were $146/pistons and $37/rings, couldn't beat that anywhere....just for a cruiser you really don't need anything exotic. A healthy 327 will make your coupe get down the road just fine. Pm me if you need any more info....good luck on your build, Dave
 

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31fordcoupe said:
A "bushed pin" the same thing as a "floating pin" correct?
A bushed pin in this case means the small end was taken out OS and a bushing was inserted to become the bearing surface for the floating piston pin. A non-bushed rod can still have floating pins, however.

Is there any problem or down side to using them on a street / strip motor?
There are two main advantages in floating pins, and a couple down sides.

Advantages are that there are two surfaces of a floating pin (the ID of the rod's small end, and the ID of the piston pin bore) to share the duties, and the pistons can be removed/installed quickly, w/no heating and/or pressing of the pins into and out of the rods.

The down side is cost and the fact that the clips that hold the pins in place have been known to break, which will take out that cylinder and (usually) piston. Some type of clips have small tangs that, if not removed (which then makes piston removal harder), can break off and tear up the cylinder wall and piston.

In your case, I would say that floating pins are not needed.
 
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