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You can't do this at home. The kit that Eastwood sells if for very small parts that will fit in your oven. For anything bigger than a valve cover, get it done professionally. In fact, get the valve cover done professionally! It really isn't cost effective to do this yourself when you figure in the mis-fires you will have. It is in the realm of chrome plating as far as do-it-yourself goes. It takes a bunch of specialty equipment including a car sized 400deg bake oven, full sized 100hp sand blaster, good air filtering equipment, very specialized spray guns and city zoning to make a big dusty mess for a quarter mile radius. Then there is the issue of practice. Not done right and there will be holidays in the final coating that can't be repaired without a full sand blast and recoating. Plus there is a shelf life to the powder. Discouraged yet?

Actually, it doesn't cost that much when you figure the cost of having your components sand blasted, then the cost of a good urethane paint. Powder coating takes care of all of that. I just took my 6 cylinder engine block and head to be done in dead white and it will cost $150. A polished aluminum auto trans case is obviously not sand blasted and a coat of clear costs $50. Not bad when you consider all the masking and prep required to do these pieces. As I recall, a bare frame costs in the range of $500 and the entire undercarriage including the frame and all the MII front end components, leaf springs, motor and trans mounts, etc. is in the $800 range. Again compare that to the best commercial sand blast job and good urethane paint that will have chips before you get it all reassembled.

Incidentally, this coating never "dries" because it is never wet. The process is to sandblast the substrate to white metal, attach electrodes to it and to the spray gun so they are electrostatically charged, spray on an extremely fine dry powdered plastic that sucks onto the surface due to the electrostatic charge then place it in an oven and actually melt the plastic powder onto the sand blasted surface. When cooled, this is an extremely durable and attractive surface.
 

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Don't even think of exposing the powder to an open flame! Organic substances become as explosive as dynamite when in a powder form. There really isn't a good alternative to having powdwe coating done commercially. If you aren't prepared to go this route, stick with a catalyzed urethane paint job which is an excellent second choice.
 

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Bull has it right. This stuff is relatively cheap. With paint going for upwards of $100/gallon, this is a very attractive alternative. As with everything, preparation is the key. The more prep you can do, the less it will cost you. Personally, I like to take advantage of the professional sandblasting service, especially for frames and such, rather than spending a day or two of my time doing it. Also, they can clear coat polished aluminum (transmission cases, etc.) with out sandblasting but colored parts should be blasted - coating sticks better.
 
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