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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What tips can you guys/gals give me to plan my upcomming project so it gets done succesfully. Because Im starting on my first "Frame up Restore" and im kinda nervous cause i dont want to screw something up so it takes years to get back together.
 

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> ORGANIZATION <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
This one word will be your friend when it comes time to put your project back together...
Take photos... if you don't have one, buy a cheap digital camera and take photos of anything you think will be useful. Suspension, engine, clutch linkage, brackets, wiring, etc., etc. burning the photos to a disc and putting them in folders labeled what they are will be invaluable when it comes time to re-assemble.
Shoe boxes... Go to a dollar store and buy a bunch of those plastic shoe boxes. I label the ends with a permanent marker and stack them on a set of steel shelves. I also use them for organizing sanding discs, grinding wheels, zip ties and a bunch of other things.
Zip Lock bags... Same thing as the shoe boxes. Buy a couple of different sizes and keep them in the shoe boxes to organize smaller items like dash knobs or front fender bolts.
Anything you take off should go into a bag if you're not planning to reuse it immediately and that bag should go into a box which is labeled for that group of components.
If you are planning to clean and paint everything before it goes back on the car this sysytem will work well for that also as it will keep your parts clean and dry after you refinish them.
Have fun
Mark
 

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After you get organized (and STAY THAT WAY!!) you need ot have a plan of attack. It's easy to start one thing only to get distracted by something else. So decide what you want to get done when and stick to it. I don't necessarily mean a time table, but an order to do things more than anything. Break it up into SMALL steps. Like don't say "rebuild engine". Break that up:
1. pull old engine and trans
2. find new engine/trans
3. mock up frame installation
4. send engine to shop for rebuilding
break rebuilding into at least heads and short block if doing it yourself)
etc.

And so on. You don't have to break it all down to far ahead of time, but keep 3-4 steps ahead. Then COMPLETE one task before going to another. That way you'll get more actually accomplished instead of having a bunch of seemingly never ending little projects lying around! The car will come together faster, and you can easily see your progress. You may have to rearrange things if you cme to a work stoppage problem in one step, but then you can go to the next. Just don't start more than a couple steps at once, and don't rush!
 

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Don't throw anything away. No matter how bad a part is that you take off, even if it is totally unusable and will get replaced. That way you have the old parts to compare with if something isn't going right. Or you may want to take it with you to a swap meet so you can compare and get the right thing. Many items like window garnish moldings only changed slightly from year to year and without your old one it is easy to waste money on something that won't fit.
Label everything that comes off, especially fasteners and small parts that you put in baggys. Use masking tape to label all wire ends and vacuum hoses as to where they go.
Although you can bounce around some on sub assemblys, it is best to do the chassis first, get the drive train put in. Then get the body shell bolted on after it has all the rust repair and panel replacement done, ect. Don't get ahead of yourself. The very last thing should be the interior
 

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Tazz
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First build.....

Write down a build plan...be prepared to change your plan as opportunities come your way. A camera and plenty of pictures of the before and during the build are GREAT!! Bag and box your parts as you disassemble and put in a name tag to help you remember whats what and we-here it came from. Watch the local papers for stuff you can use on your project and go to swap meets too...then there is Summit Racing and Jegs and the like to buy the NEW STUFF at. Just go your own way with your build...a lot of people will give you advice as to how your ride should look...follow your own build plan...use the good advice is if fits your build plan and throw out the rest. Be prepared to answer...Why did you do that to that car...because some people will not appreciate what ever you do.....I just tell them That its my ride and I built it for myself.


Tazz


Rat Rods Rule!
 

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And a lot of shelf space is nice. Gotta put those well organized neatly labled boxes somewhere.

Put up pictures of what the finished project can / will be to help with the motivation. Don't get burned out.

Take notes. Keep a clip board handy with a list of to do items and one with parts to get.

Hopefully you have some friends to help out from time to time - especially for the heavy / awkward lifting.

Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks guys for all the advice, its getting me motivated. LOL i want to do this already, but i will have to wait to march :( . Yea i had a couple of friends say they would help me.... after i rolled it. lol long story if you want to know just PM me.
 

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I've also had great success with the ziplock bags. If you splurge for the ones that have the zipper tab, they're a lot easier to seal with greasy/gloved fingers than the old-style ones.

I would also add that those cheapo disposable food containers (sold right next to the zip-lock bags) are really useful too.

I got a lot of paper boxes (the boxes that copy paper comes in) so I could consolidate the smaller boxes and bags, and also hold larger items (starter, alternator,etc.) so they don't get separated from the fasteners.


Make sure you mark everything with a permanent marker (like a Sharpie). Some markers will dissolve away in grease and oil.

I also found one of those paint pens like the junkyard uses, only with a fine tip, at the local parts store. You have to sand it off (lacquer thinner might also work) but it is great for marking really important parts and for marking alignments before removal.

I found that a lot of my boxes full of labelled parts weren't really all that heavy, but they were bulky. I was able to build a temporary shelf and hang them from the ceiling. Saved a lot of floor space.


The best advice I can give is to take your time and enjoy the process. Driving the finished machine is a blast, but I have some really fond memories of doing the work that got it back on the road.
 

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All this advice is good but.. one thing that I've learned from doing big projects is to have a TON of money to through at it. If you don't you'll stall at the beginning and lose interest. See all the half completed projects in the paper? I have a 67 C-10 in my shop now thats been there for 10 years, I managed to stick with it and it's like 98% finished. But it's cost alot even though I've done all the work myself. The guys that go into a big projects broke will never complete them. Good luck!
 

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One thing that can help with the finances is to plan as well as you can and then look for deals.

For example, say you were looking for a T56 transmission and they go for $1500 at the yard (just making that number up). With some research on the going rate for parts, you might find that you're better off buying a totalled firebird at an auction for maybe $2500, and then selling off all the parts you don't need. You'll be out a lot of time and labor, but you may end up with the trans for practically nothing, and you'll get any cables/linkages/brackets you might have forgotten. If you end up using the rear-end, or the engine, or something else (seats?), then you're way ahead.

Ebay's probably the default marketplace for liquidating parts. You can search closed auctions to get an idea of what things are going for. Need to be careful, but if you're informed, then you might be able to make it work.
 

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Dreadlord said:
very good advice...... im kinda that way right now :pain: i was thinking of taking a loan mabye.
My advice is to quit thinking about a loan. Financing and toy cars do not go well together. For that matter financing and new practical cars do not go well together.
 

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You'll likely have to get a signature loan, since banks don't like to use incomplete vehicles for collateral! ;>

I'd avoid the little finance companies that might consider a loan. Their rates tend to be high. If you do decide on the loan, talk to your bank first. Find out what you can get on a signature loan. The best way to finance (if you have to) is to go in small stages. Get a signature loan for say $1000, work with that, then pay it off ASAP. Once it's paid off and you've run through the parts you bought, get another small loan if/when needed. That will keep you from running up to much debt, and you won't be out so much if you get tired of the project. You'd be amazed at how many people start something they never finish!

When I do custom work for others I usually require a certain amount up front. When that's gone I'll let them know and negotiate an amount of time to have the next installment (and amount) or the vehicle moved. A vehicle taking up room and not bringing in anything is no good! If it sits to long, it's just mine -- but that's in the contract we signed before any work started. I usually allow 90 days since last contact before claiming, and 30 days after provable notification (return receipt or certified mail).
 
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