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EFI Rules and Carbs Drool
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I'm sure mixing bondo is second nature to most, but is it worth actually measurig out both parts to mix? It seems if you have a consistant mix everytime, that might help even out sanding. Or would it be just a waste of time?
 

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experience is the best determiner. Personally, I vary the mix depending on what I am doing. Small areas I mix hot for quick work times. Big area cold for extended work time. In any event, I don't mix more than a pound ata time. Workm it down with a grater before it is hard set. When you scratch it with a fingernail and it leaves a white streak it is ready for the rough work. cut it close to final level, let it set till you can't scratch with your nails and it is ready for contouring. Hope this helps. :)
 

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Evercoat says...

Evercoat came to our shop a few months ago, and said that you should put a line of hardner across your bondo from one end to the other no matter what size, but avoid balling it up, keep it spread out as flat as possible. They say that balling it up will cause it to (kick) off faster...

They say this, but experience makes all the difference, as 61Bone stated.
 

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I'v probably been through more than 50 gallons of the stuff! I don't even think about how much hardener to add, just do it. A little goes a long way so I always mix a little lean. Still kicks fast enough and remember, if you mix in too much hardener, it can tend to bleed through your paint job since it isn't needed to activate the resin. I learned that the hard way in the early years. Mixed the Bondo rich and about a year after the final paint job, started getting discolored splotches where the Bondo harder was leeching up.
 

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I have found that the instructions that say run a line of it across you filler that that is too much and it will kick way too soon. Experience has taught me to vary the hardener (within reason) depending on ambient temperature. Colder demands more hardener, hotter demands less.

Vince
 
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