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Just a firefighter
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324 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting my '46 Chevy Panel ready for painting and right now I'm doing the sanding and priming. The problem and question I have is that I'm doing all this in my garage and I have no control over the humidity. I have been waiting on the weather but now with spring rains it is sometimes a week or more before I can get a low humidity day. Will higher humidity effect primer other than slowing down the drying time?? I know when I do the finish coats it will and I will be at the mercy of the weather but right now I need to get the primer down so I can finish getting it ready.

Thanks :)
 

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Hey Blupen- I know others may disagree here, but this is what worked for me- I did a guy's car years ago and the humidity was trerrible (Iowa always is!!) At times I'd go to the garage and the car would be wet with condensation. I battled it for a while, but when the sun came out brought it out in the heat and let it dry really well- it is similar, I feel, as to when you wet sand- if you can get it good and dry (before too long of a time) you will be okay- but if it has been in the rain and left wet very long you may get rust under the primer- use HK's trick of a heat gun/or hair dryer if you feel an area is not getting dry enough. If you keep him in the garage you should be okay for a few months.The job I did is still looking good 10 years later. Using a catalyzed primer is better in wetter areas. Good luck and make sure it is a good sunny day with less humidity when you paint. :)

[ May 02, 2003: Message edited by: Dragon J ]</p>
 

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Just a firefighter
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324 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks DJ, I don't have that big of a problem like you did its just that the RH (Relative humidity) of the air here at times is between 60 to 90%, just plain sticky. I've been waiting for days where its below 50% looking more for less than 40% and it takes awhile for them to hit. Like now I'm doing the doors and doing one door a day, stripping, filling and sanding getting them just right. I was going to prime one yesterday but the humidity was at 87% with bright clear sunshine, and I wasn't sure so I backed off and am going to wait for a better day. Thats the concern I have, do I need to wait for better days or will it be alright to go ahead and prime them??
Thanks again :)

[ May 02, 2003: Message edited by: Bluepen ]</p>
 

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I'd go ahead and prime- I've even painted whole cars at 87% but had to wait MUCH longer for them to set up and then rolled into the sun to kind of 'bake it' on. Prime what you want and get it in the sun! I've done tons of work 'piecemeal' like that 'cuz on customs I change my mind so much!! It would be good to wait for a day in the 40-50% range when you paint. Less headaches and you can also get 'blushing' of the color w/too much humidity. Keep on primin' tho!! :cool:
 
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