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hey i have a red 84 camaro that the paint is in decent condition, but on the rear fender bodywork was done so it has a grey patch of primer and the bumpers faded into a different shade of red.


basically i was looking into using rattle cans to spray the whole car primer black. i have black tinted windows and chrome wheels on it right now and i figured having the car be complete 1 color would be better than where its at now. i dont ever plan on having it be a showcar or anything and i have a 383 stroker in my garage im working on so its just gonna be my street/strip project.

so my questions are-

does the temp outside matter? because its like 35 degrees outside.
should i sand the factory paint at all?


*** im 17 years old and am impatient
 

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Lost in the 60's
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If you want the primer to stick you are going to have to sand the car. It also needs to be warmer to paint or apply the primer.
 

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With lacquer or spray can products, temp doesn't matter so much if you can keep it from running. They never really cure all the way through anyways, but if cold may be stay sticky till it warms up. They are soluble and a wipe of solvent will soften and remove them. With activated products, you need to stay above 60, you need this temp for the activator to work. Activated products will be much more durable, won't resoften, and cure all the way through. They will provide far better protection and longevity. This is way you don't see too many good paint and body places using lacquer and unactivated products today with the much better urethanes and epoxys around. I don't see anything really wrong with spraying the car with rattle can, as long as the bodywork area has good protection as well as the rest of the car having a good protective base. Rattle can paints and primers won't give protection and metal areas will rust under lacquer primer. Lacquer primer also can give mapping around bodywork areas. http://www.sherwin-automotive.com/reference/troubleshooting_guide/edge_mapping/index.cfm If you spray bombed the whole thing, you would have to sand all that junk off before a "real" paint job or it may cause you problems. But with the price of spray bombs to do a car with, might as well just save up and do it right the first time. The amount of spray cans to paint a car, you could get a cheaper activated paint at about the same price, and it will be far better gloss and lasting. Save up for when you got the money and equipment to do it right, and just make sure you somehow get the bodywork area protected with epoxy. You could brush it on or use a preval sprayer if you absolutely had to, but sounds like gramps has got something you can work with.
 

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302/Z28 said:
And whatever you do, do not use rattle can primer. It is one of the worst bases for a paint job there is. The stuff will need to be completely removed before a decent paint job can go on it.

Vince
Rattlecan primer works fine. I've used it for the last 20 years, no problems. It works especially well for spot jobs.
 

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trust who you want. Do an experiment. Paint two bare metal panels, one with epoxy (but give it a chance to do it curing), one with lacquer primer. . Leave them sit outside exposed to the elements for awhile and for kicks throw some road salt or some chemicals on them.
 

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tab said:
Rattlecan primer works fine. I've used it for the last 20 years, no problems. It works especially well for spot jobs.
Spoken by someone who truly knows little to NOTHING about paint or painting.
 
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