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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
How far do you drive every month?
Likely better to put it back togethor with what you have now and keep driving it and look for a replacement.
I don't drive much, just mainly within the city limits, only because I don't trust the engine well enough to routinely take it out of town like I would like to.

Furthest I've been is 45 miles away from home, and it wasn't running as near as good as it is now.

I honestly want to replace the cam and I might as well do it while I'm motivated. I should have replaced it when I did my timing chain. At least I'll know what I actually have doing so...
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Let's say I was going to swap out my 305 for a 350...

I would want to reuse my current idle-5,000 intake and 600cfm carburetor ...is that do-able ?

I have a TH350C transmission with a 13-1500 stall converter...is that do-able ?

If so, what year and models should I be looking for with the 350 I need ?
 

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Yes.

The only exception would be that L31 Vortec heads would not bolt to your current intake. Also, the 1987-1995 heads would not bolt to your current intake. The bolt pattern of the 87-95 intake looks like the 55-86 pattern but the 2 bolts on each side of tge plenum meet the head at a different angle.

There are many aftermarket heads in aluminum and cast iron that do accept your current intake. Most aftermarket aluminum heads are .1 inch taller from their head gasket surface to the valve spring pocket; this requires a .1 inch longer than stock stem valve. Everything else is the same dimension as production except that the push rods also need to be .1 inch longer.

The 350 including the 86 and up with the one piece rear seal bolts to your 350. However, the 86 up crankshaft requires a same date period flex plate because the crankshaft bolt circle is smaller than that of the two piece crank flange of 1955-1985. The converter bolt pattern and the starter ring gears remain the same as 55 through present crate engines. There are two ring gear counts at 153 for the 10.75 inch dia. flex plate and 168 for the 11.5. Most blocks are drilled and tapped for the straight bolt starter pattern of the 153 tooth and the slightly angled bolt pattern of the starter for the 168 tooth flex plate.

Chevy V8’s big or small block excepting the 2000 Gen-III and up series that replaced the classic SBC use the same bellhousing bolt and depth pattern since 1955. The 90 degree V6 derived from the Chevy V8 and the inline Chevy 6 and derived inline 4 use the V8 pattern since 1963. So all Chevy transmissions easily interchange through these dates in terms of mounting to these engines.

Probably a good idea to start copying the data that’s been coming your way to paste together a data book of what goes with what. Chevy makes several twists and turns so there are things that easily interchange and places where it gets tricky.

edit addendum:

I was going to add before getting interrupted by wifey that transmissions also get tired with age. There is a strong possibility that it will need an overhaul as well as you either drive more aggressively an what you currently have, or beef up the performance of your current engine or go to a larger engine. All of these possibilities add stress to the transmission actually the entire drive train.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Okay, I ended up putting everything back together because I can't afford to replace the engine at the moment.

I used the PrintOSeal gasket set and it runs, I have drove it on the highway three times since then.

However, the ticking noise hasn't went away...

I'm pretty sure it's a lifter tick because it fades out after 2,000 rpms and from what I understand that exhaust leak would get louder during acceleration and under load.

I'm thinking what I could do is just replace the top end such as the rocker arms and push rods and rocker nuts to eliminate the possibility of bend push rods and damaged rockers.

Product Body jewelry Automotive tire Font Bicycle part


Can I install this kit without having to replace the lifters and camshaft ?
 

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A couple likely choices of what’s going on:

1. If it is an issue of cam lobe and lifter foot wear and the lifter ticks this would indicate that the wear has reached a point where the plunger trying to maintain the zero load setting has run out of upward adjustment distance. In this case the plunger would be positioned against the retaining clip at the top of the lifter body and the push rod would be loose.

1.a. Running the engine with a stethoscope should pinpoint which rocker is clattering. Removing that valve cover should reveal that the rocker does not open this valve as much as those adjacent to it.

1.b. Not taking action can result in the push rod uncoupling from the rocker or being bent if it gets bound in its guide. Adjusting to the point of quieting the tick will forestall that failure for a while.

2. The other most likely possibility fit the lifter tick is the check valve on the bottom of the plunger is leaking, therefore, not holding the plunger in its preset position as the lobe lifts the body of the lifter against the pressure of the valve spring. This check valve will be a lightly loading spring against either a ball or a wafer in a cage on the bottom of the plunger. If this valve is leaking the plunger will bleed down as the cam lobe raises the lifter body and valve spring force opposes the plunger being lifted with the lifter body because the oil trapped beneath the plunger is leaking back into the oil reservoir in the upper section of the lifter. Engine oil pressure is no where sufficient to oppose the valve spring force. The oil inside the upper part of the plunger is only a feed puddle to the chamber beneath the plunger that is fed or vented by the metering valve riding on the underside of the plunger or internal “piston” of the lifter.

2.a. There could be trash that circulated with the oil has become caught in the bottom check valve of the lifter in which case disassembly and cleaning might restore operation.

2.b. Or that this valve or seat has worn to the point that it leaks. Either way this valve is what maintains the plunger adjustment.

3.0 Excessive clearance allowing oil to escape the lifter.

3.a. The oil from the compression pocket in the bottom is leaking around the plunger due to wear or damage to the interior wall of the lifter body or that outside wall of the plunger.

3.b. Wear between the lifter body and its bore in the block is excessive to where the timing of the reservoir feed hole is off and the reservoir is leaking or not filling properly. This is pretty rare but does happen.

4.0 A link to a cut away lifter so you can visualize how there parts are nested and work together.

 

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Based on post #42 video that cam is quite flat and the lifters are quite worn. I wouldn't drive it unless your're planning to just drive it until it won't go anymore and never fix it. It needs the cam and lifters very badly at this point. You may be able to save this engine for a while if you do the cam and lifters, but metal particles from your camshaft are circulating in your oil. I say fix it if you're going to drive it at all. That top end kit is the least of your worries - not much help. Pretty soon (if not already) you will wear through the bottom of the lifter and into the internal oil passage - then the lifter collapses completely. This kind of lifter cannot be adjusted correctly, since it is always collapsed and will never self-adjust to zero clearance. This may be your problem all along in trying to adjust them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
You sure can, but why!
New parts aren’t going to miraculously cure the tick.
‘Likely it’s the cam.
‘Keep the money until you have enough stashed away to do it right with a rebuilt or new motor.
I just assumed that maybe one of my push rods was bent because that's what I didn't check when I had them pulled out... They look straight to me but apparently I should have rolled them across the table to see if they would continue to roll or if they would stop which would indicate that they're bent.

I also realize that I only put 3.7 quarts when I did my oil change and some of that spilled when I did my valve adjustments with the engine running. I'm going to buy another quart and some more zinc additive and see if that quietens the tick slightly.

I don't think I'll be replacing the motor anytime soon, but I can definitely look into a camshaft and lifter replacement within the upcoming months. Hopefully the engine last me that long...as many oil changes that I have done on this engine, I haven't seen any metal shavings or bits in the oil..
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Based on post #42 video that cam is quite flat and the lifters are quite worn. I wouldn't drive it unless your're planning to just drive it until it won't go anymore and never fix it. It needs the cam and lifters very badly at this point. You may be able to save this engine for a while if you do the cam and lifters, but metal particles from your camshaft are circulating in your oil. I say fix it if you're going to drive it at all. That top end kit is the least of your worries - not much help. Pretty soon (if not already) you will wear through the bottom of the lifter and into the internal oil passage - then the lifter collapses completely. This kind of lifter cannot be adjusted correctly, since it is always collapsed and will never self-adjust to zero clearance. This may be your problem all along in trying to adjust them.
Which part of the video indicates that ? I've had other guys tell me the lifters are worn but the cam looks normal...just curious as to what you're looking at differently than what they we're missing..

I just got a job and I'll need this motor to commute to and from work at least the next month or two to stack enough money for either a cam swap or engine swap...
 

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The oil is pooling in the center of a lot of the lifter faces, indicating they are quite concave. If the lifters are concave, the cam is also worn to fit the concave area. Remember it is called a flat tappet cam, not a concave tappet cam :) Not sure why anyone could tell you a cam is OK when lifter faces are junk - there is no way to look at a cam lobe through the lifter bore and tell anyways.

IMHO the engine swap will be your best bet if you drive this engine a normal amount for a couple of months the way that it is. Circulating fine metal particles will trash it completely!

Putting a cam and lifters in should hopefully stop the carnage and save it for a much longer time, however this engine's days are numbered in any case - damage has been done to cylinder walls and bearing surfaces too. This is done by super fine metal particles that you can't see, unless a lot of them settle in the oil (try putting used oil in a glass jar and let settle for several days - then look at the bottom). It will eventually need fully repaired or replaced, but hopefully should last you much longer than a couple of months until you can save up enough money to get a nice 350 or 383 as a crate engine (that would be the least expensive). I would hesitate to buy someone else's used problem - good used SBC engines are very rare these days - too old. Kind of like if you was to take yours out and sell it to someone just like it is! Would you want to buy it?

Can you borrow the $200 it would take (from your parents or someone), to fix this one for now? Get the cam and lifters coming - then do the job on a weekend when you have time off? Hopefully you have a place to work inside. If so, be sure to use good cam lube (cam should come with some) and High ZZDP oil or ZDDP additive - then do a proper cam break-in procedure. Personally I like the "Joe Gibbs Driven" engine assembly lube for the camshaft because it is kind of a gel and stays put - but admittedly there are lots of choices that will work.

But if you have to wait I understand. Many of us have been there...... I once had only $20 to feed my family for a week. You do what you have to do.

Good luck and best wishes
 

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It’s ‘leave her’ time Ty!
Leave the damn thing alone. Drive it, go to work!
Save every penny you can and plan for that new motor in the spring. No band aid fixes. No cam and lifter changes, nothing but the essentials to get you by until then. You need to start fresh. Any thing else is a waste of money.
 

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It’s ‘leave her’ time Ty!
Leave the damn thing alone. Drive it, go to work!
Save every penny you can and plan for that new motor in the spring. No band aid fixes. No cam and lifter changes, nothing but the essentials to get you by until then. You need to start fresh. Any thing else is a waste of money.
And that is the other way to look at the problem. Only question is will this engine last long enough ..... no one knows for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
The oil is pooling in the center of a lot of the lifter faces, indicating they are quite concave. If the lifters are concave, the cam is also worn to fit the concave area. Remember it is called a flat tappet cam, not a concave tappet cam :) Not sure why anyone could tell you a cam is OK when lifter faces are junk - there is no way to look at a cam lobe through the lifter bore and tell anyways.

IMHO the engine swap will be your best bet if you drive this engine a normal amount for a couple of months the way that it is. Circulating fine metal particles will trash it completely!

Putting a cam and lifters in should hopefully stop the carnage and save it for a much longer time, however this engine's days are numbered in any case - damage has been done to cylinder walls and bearing surfaces too. This is done by super fine metal particles that you can't see, unless a lot of them settle in the oil (try putting used oil in a glass jar and let settle for several days - then look at the bottom). It will eventually need fully repaired or replaced, but hopefully should last you much longer than a couple of months until you can save up enough money to get a nice 350 or 383 as a crate engine (that would be the least expensive). I would hesitate to buy someone else's used problem - good used SBC engines are very rare these days - too old. Kind of like if you was to take yours out and sell it to someone just like it is! Would you want to buy it?

Can you borrow the $200 it would take (from your parents or someone), to fix this one for now? Get the cam and lifters coming - then do the job on a weekend when you have time off? Hopefully you have a place to work inside. If so, be sure to use good cam lube (cam should come with some) and High ZZDP oil or ZDDP additive - then do a proper cam break-in procedure. Personally I like the "Joe Gibbs Driven" engine assembly lube for the camshaft because it is kind of a gel and stays put - but admittedly there are lots of choices that will work.

But if you have to wait I understand. Many of us have been there...... I once had only $20 to feed my family for a week. You do what you have to do.

Good luck and best wishes
Great answer and I appreciate it. Maybe I can borrow or side hustle something for a cam and lifter kit to get me by to prepare for an engine swap.

And brother I've been there too, it's only a temporary situation.
 
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