Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 20 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Heres what I need to do.I want to be able to cut off the welding current while not stopping the wire feed...Mabee a foot control or something...what I want it to do is weld the wire to the metal then cut off the current while still feeding the wire out so the wire is welded to the metal then I can cut off the wire from the torch and use the wire to pull dents out...thereby eliminating the need for a stud welder...I need to know if a foot switch is what I want and if so where do I connect it..Is it even possible????
Any thoughts???
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,464 Posts
Wow, that's pretty creative. I am curious to see what can come of this.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Do you have a Arc Welder? I've done this type of thing clamping onto a gas torch type welding rod at a low amp setting and after the rod was fused to the work just let go. Never tried it on sheet metal but hey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Heres what I need to do.I want to be able to cut off the welding current while not stopping the wire feed...Mabee a foot control or something...what I want it to do is weld the wire to the metal then cut off the current while still feeding the wire out so the wire is welded to the metal then I can cut off the wire from the torch and use the wire to pull dents out...thereby eliminating the need for a stud welder...I need to know if a foot switch is what I want and if so where do I connect it..Is it even possible????
Any thoughts???
How about using something like a battery kill switch on the ground cable, just before the ground clamp? It would kill the current flow of the arc and still let the wire keep feeding. That way you wouldn't have to mess with the inner workings of the welder itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
real simple. Get one of those dent pullers that screw into the sheet metal and weld on the end of it a 2 inch piece of 3 3/2- 1/8 inch stick rod. Then with your mig tack it on the dent and when you hit it it will pull the dent then break off. Repeat the process till your happy. Simple and fast once you do it a few times.
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,464 Posts
How about using something like a battery kill switch on the ground cable, just before the ground clamp? It would kill the current flow of the arc and still let the wire keep feeding. That way you wouldn't have to mess with the inner workings of the welder itself.
BRILLIANT!:thumbup:
Use a momentary normally open switch. Step on it to make the circuit, lift your foot when you want the arc killed, brilliant I tell you!

Brian
 

·
Automotive Extraordinaire
Joined
·
1,278 Posts
now the next question...what size wire? Seems like it would have to be pretty big.

Agreed I dont think the wire would be strong enough, but I could be wrong. If you don't own a stud gun, why not just use the old screw in type puller and weld the holes shut when done. Or weld several tabs of metal and pull with a jaw type puller then grind off?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
motor starter relay

My old Airco tig has a hand crank amp controll and HI freq switch. It would want to keep welding after I turned of the HF switch. I never changed it but I have a couple of Motor starters like used on commercial equipment, They are made work on 3 phase but you just hook up the 2 wires for single phase, they have the actuating coil that can be interchanged for different controll voltages, I was going to use a 110 v coil and a $ 20 foot pedal from graingers. But I bought a Newer Lincoln Sq wave 255 Tig. I still like the old Airco to stick weld with since I can use HF stick when welding on painted dirty farm equipment. The Lincoln HF only works on Tig. you would use the foot pedal on the weld power supply circuit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How about using something like a battery kill switch on the ground cable, just before the ground clamp? It would kill the current flow of the arc and still let the wire keep feeding. That way you wouldn't have to mess with the inner workings of the welder itself.
I was thinking about the ground but theres a lot of current going through there ...I think I'll have someone pull the clamp while I weld and see what happens...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
real simple. Get one of those dent pullers that screw into the sheet metal and weld on the end of it a 2 inch piece of 3 3/2- 1/8 inch stick rod. Then with your mig tack it on the dent and when you hit it it will pull the dent then break off. Repeat the process till your happy. Simple and fast once you do it a few times.
sure for big dents that require lots of pulling that 'll work,.. even connecting 4-5 studs together and pulling them all at the same time.this would be more for golf ball size dents and dings...One quick zap with the welder then pull the wire with a pair of vice grips or vice grips welded to a puller. The thing is a welder is a neccesity and almost everyone has one but a stud welder ,Thats a luxury that;ll be used very little so most DIY's wont have one ..converting a mig to do this would be pretty handy...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My old Airco tig has a hand crank amp controll and HI freq switch. It would want to keep welding after I turned of the HF switch. I never changed it but I have a couple of Motor starters like used on commercial equipment, They are made work on 3 phase but you just hook up the 2 wires for single phase, they have the actuating coil that can be interchanged for different controll voltages, I was going to use a 110 v coil and a $ 20 foot pedal from graingers. But I bought a Newer Lincoln Sq wave 255 Tig. I still like the old Airco to stick weld with since I can use HF stick when welding on painted dirty farm equipment. The Lincoln HF only works on Tig. you would use the foot pedal on the weld power supply circuit.
would that be on the primary side of the transformer alowing current to the rest of the machine ? You wouldn't want to switch the secondary side, would you???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Agreed I dont think the wire would be strong enough, but I could be wrong. If you don't own a stud gun, why not just use the old screw in type puller and weld the holes shut when done. Or weld several tabs of metal and pull with a jaw type puller then grind off?
I do have a stud welder but the main problem is you have to grind no less than a quarter size area for the gun to work also if a ding is in the middle of a hood the amount of pressure it takes to make an electrical connection makes the ding worst when it gets hot...
If we can get this to work all it would take is a tiny little hit with a grinder just enough for the wire to make a connection and a quick zap with the welder and you can pull the exact amount as needed by leaving enough paint so you can see when its right...Thats the one advantage a screw type dent puller has over a stud puller ,you can see what your doing by looking in the paint
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
switching power

I haven't looked at a wining diagram to see how one is wired, but if the welding circuit is separate from the feed roller motor and gas solenoid . then the foot pedal could be uset to cut off the weld like on my lincoln tig that continues gas flow when I stop welding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
try weld talk

I have an old miller spool gun that I wanted to use on my lincoln SP 200 commercial size wire feed for welding aluminum faster than Tig. I signed up for the Weld Talk Forum. Some of the service tech's and welding engineers are on weld forums. You might get a better answer from a Pro there .The answer there was to just buy a $ 1200 power pack to run the spool gun. I wanted to find out if the lincoln would make it work. Spool guns are a lot cheaper now, I might look at a lincoln for mine and sell the old Miller.
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,464 Posts
I do have a stud welder but the main problem is you have to grind no less than a quarter size area for the gun to work also if a ding is in the middle of a hood the amount of pressure it takes to make an electrical connection makes the ding worst when it gets hot...
If we can get this to work all it would take is a tiny little hit with a grinder just enough for the wire to make a connection and a quick zap with the welder and you can pull the exact amount as needed by leaving enough paint so you can see when its right...Thats the one advantage a screw type dent puller has over a stud puller ,you can see what your doing by looking in the paint
Very good points, I HATE how that stud welder has so much pressure on the stud being pushed into the metal.

Brian
 

·
put up or shut up
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
this is also why you don't use those cheapie HF stud guns. They require too much heat to get the studs to stick. A good gun does it with a light triggering. I never had problems with the pressure but heat on newer cars no doubt. Had hail damage on a Subaru hood recently "get away" from me. I can't say for sure the little shrinking that occured during welding the stud in did it OR it was just stretched from the hail damage but once I got it straight the shrinking begun and in the end it was tight but with a bigger skim coat than I would have wanted. "It got away from me"
 

·
Hotrodders.com moderator
Joined
·
9,581 Posts
Gee guys you can hold a washer on edge with a needle nose pliers and do a quick tack and hook your slide hammer to that and it works well..a number 10 or 12 washer is about right for that..

Sam
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,464 Posts
this is also why you don't use those cheapie HF stud guns. They require too much heat to get the studs to stick. A good gun does it with a light triggering. I never had problems with the pressure but heat on newer cars no doubt. Had hail damage on a Subaru hood recently "get away" from me. I can't say for sure the little shrinking that occured during welding the stud in did it OR it was just stretched from the hail damage but once I got it straight the shrinking begun and in the end it was tight but with a bigger skim coat than I would have wanted. "It got away from me"
Never used a HF stud gun but I can't stress enough a tip taught to me by a serious tool inventor that using the stud gun you don't need much heat. I understand may be describing this exact thing, the HF doesn't even have enough to do this. I am posting this for any lurkers who haven't seen it.

This video shows how little a tap on the trigger you should need.



Brian
 
1 - 20 of 64 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top