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Hey all... I'm interested in a mgb, however the rear driver side has been hit. Does this look like it could be pulled out? Am I looking for trouble with kind of damage? Frame likely tweaked?

Thoughts?
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Though it is repairable from that photo you are asking a lot if you haven't done this sort of thing and have a frame rack. There is some severe damage to the structure and if you were to look at the car on the side the quarter panel is likely against the door, the panel in front of the deck lid is likely damaged bad too, the top probably won't go up and down properly. It is likely twisted, it looks like that left side is probably down. The frame rail (it's a unibody) is very possibly buckled down. This car was hit very hard and unless it's a darn special car other wise with super low miles or in exceptional shape, I believe it's now a parts car.

Brian
 

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Frame Rack ?

When I lived in Calif I had a friend that used to Buy wrecked cars, Fix and re- sell. I still I have My HEAVY duty Flat bed equipmet trailer, 3 pieces of 8 inch C channel main Rail, 4 in channel cross bracing and 1/4 in steel floor, 10 K winch, He used to borrow it, get the car chained down, blocked solid , double the cables to have 20 K of pulling and straighten them out. And sometimes I would help with my back hoe to give some lift and more pull in another direction, It can be hard to get one straight with out equipment. Usually the cost to send to a frame shop will eat up any margin in your rebuild budget.
 

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thats a bodymans special.. cheap for them to fix( if you call your labor free)
like Brian said.. it was stuffed hard, but to a body guy looking for that type car, it be a cheap way to get into one..
if it's almost rust free.. and being an mg..
it's worth being fixed to those in love with this type car..

this is something my dad would fix as he likes fixing/straight'n cars and not replacing metal.. he gets joy, looking over the car, the hit and what moved and how and pulling it back in reverse..
what he did to a older m/b gullwing that was stuffed to the rear window.. without replacing any metal.. makes me sit in awe..
can't wait to see him do his 49 willy's p/u just to watch .. it's an art form.. lost on many of todays cut and replace bodymen..
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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No, not from what I remember.

Brian
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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In structure the MGB was a radically, modern design in 1962, utilizing a monocoque structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame construction used on both the MGA and MG T-types and the MGB's rival, the Triumph TR series. However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947. The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver's compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats.
The MGB's performance was considered brisk at the time of its introduction, with a 0–60 mph (96 km/h) time of just over 11 seconds, aided by the relatively light weight of the car. Handling was one of the MGB's strong points. The 3-bearing 1798 cc B-Series engine produced 95 hp (71 kW) at 5,400 rpm. The engine was upgraded in October 1964 to a five-bearing crankshaft in an effort to improve reliability. The majority of MGBs were exported to United States. In 1974, as US air pollution emission standards became more rigorous, US-market MGBs were de-tuned for compliance. As well as a marked reduction in performance, the MGB gained an inch (25 mm) in ride height and the distinctive rubber bumpers which came to replace the chrome for all markets.
The MGB was one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph (48 km/h) impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).[2][3]
Combined production volume of MGB, MGC and MGB GT V8 models was 523,836 cars. A very limited-production "revival" model with only 2,000 units made, called RV8 was produced by Rover in the 1990s. Despite the similarity in appearance to the roadster, the RV8 had less than 5 percent parts interchangeability with the original car.
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that quarter is toast. It needs to be straightened out and cut out as well as the lower rear body panel. how is the gap to the door and the trunk floor/drop off? That hit has hidden damage all over it. A good pole and some chain can come in handy.
 
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